Saturday, April 11, 2015

Dust Bowl



Welcome to Dust Bowl Week here at OPOD. I read yesterday that California might be experiencing the worst drought since the Middle Ages. Wow, that is pretty serious. So, I thought this would be a good time to look back at the drought of the 1930's known as the Dust Bowl. The picture above is from 1937, and was taken in West Texas. 

7 comments:

  1. This sure looks bleak, must have been very though times.

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  2. This looks straight out of the HBO show Carnivalé, also set during the Dust Bowl. Excited to see what's coming up next!

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  3. Yes indeed. I work in the water industry here in California. 2014 was terrifyingly scarey. 2015 is devistating. It brings out the good and bad in people. I'm still waiting for thee good to come out.

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  4. I had a friend who lived in the Panhandle as a child just after the dust bowl - early 40s. He still had a horror of dust, and often talked about the scars left the psyches of some of his relatives because of the experience.

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  5. My mother, whose parents homesteaded in SD in 1907, talked about how homesteaders on the prairies contributed to the Dust Bowl. They took off the top layer of deep roots of the grasses, and when the droughts came, along with the constant winds blowing down from the Arctic, there was nothing to hold down the soil. It all turned to blowing dust. Then the droughts caused the farmers to lose their land because they couldn't get crops to grow, and with nothing at all growing, matters went from bad to worse. My grandparents homesteaded alongside four other family members, and all but one lost their lands during the Depression. If four out of five was anything like an average, homesteading in already poor land added a lot of dust to the Dust Bowl.

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  6. A very striking photo.
    -Anne K.

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  7. I can't help but note the irony of California being the destination for so many of those droughted out Oklahomans, who lived not so far from this photograph of Texas. Who says that history doesn't repeat?

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