Monday, March 23, 2015

TR



Today we have another picture of Teddy Roosevelt during his Military Years. The picture was taken in 1898. Also, we have another quote from him:


Courtesy is as much a mark of a gentleman as courage.

5 comments:

  1. I wonder if we will ever see the likes of him again.

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    1. No, we won't. In this day and age such larger than life characters simply don't make it in public office. Added to that, given his virtually hyperactive nature, today somebody with his make up would probably be medicated to a lower stage of activity at some point in his youth.

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  2. As I recall, your first picture of TR was from the same year, but the hat is different. The first one had the left brim pinned up with crossed swords. The uniform in the other one didn't show the dark cuffs. The collar still has "USV" and I still want to know if the "V" stands for "volunteer corps" or something like that. Interesting that he's wearing what I presume is a riding glove on his right hand. It just occurred to me that I read in a recent Smithsonian article that TR and his family, after he left the presidency, began a coffee business that in a way was a precursor to Starbucks. It was one of the first respectable coffee houses in the US, where men could bring their families. The whole family was involved for some years. That's a facet of TR's life I hadn't known about before. Mostly we hear of his military and presidential careers, and his wonderful writings, which are still worth reading after all these years.

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    1. An online search shows that the V does stand for volunteer, but these were federal volunteers as opposed to state volunteers. They were actively involved in the "Philippine insurgency" as well as Cuba.

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    2. The 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry did not see action in the Philippines, and off hand I don't think the other two volunteer cavalry units did either. Only the 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry saw action in Cuba, and only because the officers (including Roosevelt) sprinted the unit to the embarkation point ahead of a unit of the New York National Guard.

      Quite a few militia (National Guard) units did, however, see service in the early stages of the Philippine Insurrection.

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