Saturday, February 21, 2015

Nethers, Virginia



Welcome to Nethers, Virginia Week. This week we will look at a little slice of American History that is lost forever. The experience that used to be Small Town America. The picture above was taken at the Nethers post office in 1935. How we got from this to where we are now in under 100 years is stunning to me. 

4 comments:

  1. An amazing and captivating photo. Thank you so much for sharing.

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  2. An amazing and captivating photo. Thank you so much for sharing.

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  3. An aunt and uncle of mine, and their 4 kids, lived during the late 1940s and all the 1950s in a tiny town in MT, on the prairies at the edge of the foothills to the Rockies. There were about 60 people in the town, which had a 4 room school going thru 8th grade, a grain elevator, and a building much like the one in the picture, that was the post office/general store/gas station. My relatives lived on the "outskirts" of town, one of the last houses, across the road from the school, but only a block from the general store/PO, etc. Their land stretched on beyond the house into the prairie. It was gorgeous country, with flat country to the east, and the sun setting over the mountains to the west. Their house was kind of a dump, no indoor plumbing except for a pump at the kitchen sink. There was an outhouse a good distance away, to keep the odor down. In the winter the smallest children used chamber pots at night or when the weather was too bad. My uncle tried to farm the land, but he never got a crop in--always too much rain, or sleet or hail, or drought. He finally went to work for the county inspecting grain elevators, and when their kids were older, she worked in the county office. Growing up in a big city, we used to think it was a great treat to go visit them. We'd pitch our tents in their front yard, and sometimes awaken to the neighbor's curious cow sticking her huge head inside the tent in the morning on her way to the barn to be milked. Their house was surrounded, in the stereotypical way, with rusted out old cars and farm equipment. They were very nice, down to earth people. After they married off two of their kids, they moved "to town," the county seat of about 1000 people. One of my cousins told me years later her dad was ashamed of raising his kids in such a shack, and I suppose it was. That mattered less than what kind of people they were and how they raised their kids. All but the youngest finished college, and that was her choice, as she married very young. Now, years later, she's finally done it and everyone's so proud of her.

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  4. Thanks, Anon, good memories of family.

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