Friday, January 30, 2015

Sharecropper Shack



This is a picture of an old Sharecropper Shack near Olive Hill, North Carolina. I actually find the cabin quiet attractive, and I would have no problem living there. You can see it is designed to allow a breeze through the cabin in summertime, and the large fireplace would keep it toasty in the wintertime. The picture was taken in 1939.

9 comments:

  1. I have really enjoyed seeing these photos of old log cabins. The year 1939 keeps popping up. Do you know why?

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  2. With no insulation and drafty doors and windows, nothing kept it "toasty" in the winter. The room pictured here is prob the kitchen, with bedrooms in the structure to the left, which together is quite large for a sharecropper shack.

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  3. Rebecca2: 1938 and 1939 saw 35mm film, good Argus and Kodak rangefinder 35mm cameras, and economic good times...

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  4. Beautiful pictures, but, don't touch my dishwasher nor my 40 in TV. Call me pampered and owning it....
    Have a great day!

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  5. Oh I seen lots of houses like that back in 1961 when I moved to western Tennessee after a wedding at the judges house.
    I never thought I would see such shacks and that people still lived in them, no running water or bathroom, still had outhouses LOL I had never been in one and didn't want to go back in one LOL
    I thought I was a southern Illinois country girl but found out I was a city girl

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  6. The photo is actually the detached kitchen, as noted by Anonymous @ 9:13. The house is on the left. Kitchens were built separate from the house because of the fire hazard, but the womenfolk would always complain about having to go outside to go to the kitchen, so the men of the house would finally give in and build a walkway to the kitchen. After the walkway was built then the womenfolk would start complaining about the lack of a roof over the walkway. You can see where I'm going here.

    I grew up in the sharecropper country of North Florida and many of my relatives lived in that, or worse. My family lived 'in town', but the old house we lived in had a similar detached kitchen that had been remodeled and joined onto the main house. It had been done quite well, but you could still see it if you stepped back and looked at it.

    Ed

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  7. I have an elderly friend who grew up as one of 12 children in a sharecropping family. We tend to forget that because of lack of availability of birth control, many such families were large. And, as was the case in many farming families, the kids were needed to work the fields, so there was no incentive to limit births. My point is that while one person, or a couple and one or two children could live "comfortably" in a log cabin this size, 14 people couldn't possibly be comfortable. My friend says that their homes, always supplied by the landlord, were "houses, of a sort." The family had to do what upkeep they could manage, and it was little enough, because they had to put their efforts into getting the crop in. It's a terrific picture, but let's not romanticize the life. Somebody in this family had the time for flowers on the porch, but I doubt that was the norm.

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  8. The rich get richer and the poor get children.

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  9. This is better than the dugouts our Texas ancestors lived in out on the South Plains--around Lubbock. There were no trees or rocks...thus no boards--unless they drove a wagon to Sweetwater--and no chimney like this one.

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