Saturday, January 12, 2013

Chain Gang



Welcome to Convicts and Chain Gang week here at OPOD. We will be looking at the various activities of the incarcerated of the last century. We start with this Chain Gang picture from Oglethorpe, Georgia in 1941. It looks like it could be a scene right out of Cool Hand Luke. If you have not seen the movie, you should rent it.

8 comments:

  1. In the mid 50's, I told my 5th grade teacher about the Chain Gangs we saw going down to Jaw-Ja.
    She said "No you didn't, they don't exist anymore."
    When parents days came, in front of the class, I asked my mom do Chain Gangs still exist? She said "Yes, they sure do." Boy, did I get the YEA'S from my friends in correcting that teacher. Now it would be a 'High 5.'
    One of my late uncle's did small time on a CG.

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  2. We could solve a lot of today's troubles by bring back chain gangs.

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    Replies
    1. Most judicial sentencing includes community service, which for many convicts means cleaning roadsides.

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  3. ''What we have here........is failure....to communicate.''

    Then there was the blond washing the car. "Lord don't let me go blind now"!!!

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    1. Congrats on getting that quote right. Most people say 'A failure'

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  4. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEJdUxitVFI

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  5. Chain gang photos from past to present with music.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmZdvVnMXCc

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  6. 1986, Atlanta metro area, we saw a chain gang cleaning up by the roadside. 1999, Peoples Republic of China, while in the process of adopting our youngest daughter, we saw a gang of young men marching down the city street in two files under armed guard, no chains. Most of them had a cocky attitude and made what were obviously rude/sexist remarks and gestures at any women standing nearby. I asked our guide who they were, and she was utterly and completely mortified. Finally she managed to squeak out that they were prisoners going to work cleaning up the town. I felt so sorry for our guide's humiliation that I told her about the men we had seen in Georgia doing the same thing, and that it was good that they had to work to make up for their wrongdoing. She gave me such a look of gratitude for my face saving remarks.

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