Sunday, November 4, 2012

Indian Recording



Indian Technology week continues here at OPOD with this wonderful picture of an Indian in the Southwest making a recording of his voice. The man pictured is Miguelito, and he is Navajo. No other details on the picture are available.

13 comments:

  1. I have no comments today.

    I was hoping for a Sunday "domistic update."

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    1. DADD, are you leading some kind of comment embargo?

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    2. I hadn't even thought of that.
      There just wasn't anything there that peak my interest.
      But I figured that I would let PJM know I looked at his OPOD.

      But ENM, now that you have brought it up!!

      "We want a domistic update".

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  2. I discovered your blog about 3 months ago, and I check it daily. LOVE IT! Keep up the good work!

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  3. Domestic update or no more comments!!!!! We wanna know about the chickies and the peacocks and the greenhouse and the tractor and the old cars. No more holding out on us.

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  4. There are 2 blogs that will not allow me to make comments - OPOD is one of them. Other blogs are fine. I can't do it on my laptop or my iPad. I wonder if others have this problem or if PJM has some setting that blocks certain computers. I am emailing this to a friend to copy/paste it. Miguelito was a Navajo Chanter (which is probably why he is making a recording) and his wife was an artist. They both worked for Harvey Company. When I taught 1st grade in AZ we had an AZ Standard that required us to teach a lesson on a famous Navajo.

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  5. The Navajo saved our skins during WWII!

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  6. Appears it was taken 2/19/1914 - http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/94509049/

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  7. Thanks Judi for the info on Miguelito. That's interesting stuff.

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  8. I'm intrigued by the wall behind him. It is obviously logs on top? Can anyone tell me what I am looking at?

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    1. This is a traditional Navajo hogan. The logs at top are cedar laid on top of the vertical cedar posts

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