Thursday, November 15, 2012

Colonel Roosevelt



Say what you will about Teddy Roosevelt, the man knew how to wear a hat. This picture was taken in 1898, so this is just about when he would be getting ready to go to Cuba for the Spanish American War. 

I still do not understand this hat style, that features one side of the brim pinned up. This is normally what I consider an Australian style, but am not sure why you would not want to shade both sides of your face with the hat brim.

11 comments:

  1. Visited his home in NYC, they have a very good museum for TR. Did you all know that there is a picture of him and his cousin a young children looking out a window at Lincoln's funeral procession in NYC.?

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  2. What a waste of about 1/3 of a hat. I wear a hat for shade from the sun, plus help keep my hair in place, but mostly to keep the sun out of my eyes.

    Teddy came to North Dakota in 1883 to hunt Bison. He was frail and skinny then, but 15 days later he bought a ranch there. And a year later bought a second ranch.

    That is the beauty of North Dakota

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    1. Buying a ranch in 15 days & another in a year, I'd say that is the beauty of having money!

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  3. per the website for the Australian army:

    The Victorian hat was an ordinary bush felt hat turned up on the right side. The intention of turning up the right side of the hat was to ensure it would not be caught during the drill movement of “shoulder arms” from “order arms”.
    By 1890, State military commandants had agreed that all Australian forces, except the artillery corps, should wear a looped-up hat of uniform pattern that was turned up on the right side in Victoria and Tasmania, and on the left side in all other States to allow for different drill movements.

    The Slouch Hat became standard issue headdress in 1903 and its brim position was mostly standardised. The slouch hat became a famous symbol of the Australian fighting man during World War One and continued to be worn throughout World War Two. Its use since that time has made it a national symbol.

    Today, Army members wear the slouch hat with the brim down to provide additional protection from the sun when not performing ceremonial duties.

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    1. Thanks! I suspected it had to do with firing guns, but am happy to hear it had to do with ceremonial arms drills.

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  4. Just saw that wonderful vintage black and white film, Arsenic and Old Lace. Have you seen it? The one character believes that he is TR, hollers "Charge!" and runs up the stairs to the second floor of the house. Such a wonderful, funny film!

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  5. Great photo of an extraordinary and mystery-filled man. Thanks for it!

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  6. Thanks for the info on the hats.

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  7. thanks for the fantastic photo of Teddy Roosevelt!!

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  8. Great picture of a fascinating man

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  9. Military hats with one side bent up like that were fairly common in the 19th Century. Originally, in the US Army, the "Hardee" hat, adopted at first for voltguiers, had such a bent. It was on the right side, so that a soldiers weapon would not contact the hat.

    Later on it simply became a style that hung on, because it hung on. Having said that, this era saw the last of that in the US Army, and even though it is still found in the Australian Army or with Gurkha's when they wear such hats, it wouldn't be used with later U.S. Army campaign hats.

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