Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Ultimate Toy



Today's picture shows what might just be the ultimate toy . . . the Wooden Crate. I am not sure how many of you had a wooden crate as a child, but they represented a toy with endless possibilities. I can even remember when my daughter was young my company had gotten a piece of scientific equipment that came in a crate about twice as tall as the one pictured. A child could stand in the crate. She made an office out of the crate, and even had a small desk and laptop computer in the office.

15 comments:

  1. We had no wooden crates, but we had boxes, which were fun, but not very durable.

    Once my siblings and I made some extremely small log cabins. There wasn't even enough room in them to sit up straight, but it was fun.

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  2. We moved a couple of times when our children were small. We didn't have any wooden crates, but the forts and houses that were built out of the packing boxes were very inventive, and were in the basement for a good long time.

    Graham in St. John's

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  3. My son's second birthday was marked by presents that went halfway up the tree. His grandparents just went nuts since that was their first Christmas with him. He opened one or two presents but then became intrigued with a tin that had held one of the presents. That was the only thing he really wanted to play with the rest of the day.

    Kids! There is just no accounting for 'em.

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  4. Dame with me, no crates, but I sure drug home a lot of boxes.
    My favorite was the applaince boxes, they were made with heavier cardboard.

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    1. That is suppose to be
      "Same with me"

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  5. I'm responding to the picture of the boy making a canoe. When I was in middle school, and all the way through high school, I whittled. Tie slides were my favorite. I made a little English lantern that actually had a small battery and lit up, and a cast iron skillit with bacon and eggs cooking, and other projects.
    The ideas often came from Boys Life Magazine which always had a whittling idea. I made balsa wood airplanes, model ships, and always had a project going.

    When I needed a career of course I chose carpentry. As I got older I gravitated to woodworking, and then furniture. There is just nothing like making things with your hands, and being playful with the ideas that grow into projects. It completely relaxes me to be able to make things out of wood and takes me back to the good memories of my childhood.

    Will

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    1. I fully agree with you.

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  6. The young people I talk to today cannot believe that many people used wooden boxes to furnish their homes with, especially the childrens areas and kitchens. These were fixed up with curtins and cloths (made by mama) of feed sacks and cloth scraps and looked very good for that time (the 20s, 30s. and 40s). The wooden produce boxes were a toy or anything else we could think up and construct.

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  7. I was thinking 'A laptop?!?' Then I realized 1990 was 22 years ago.

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  8. Wooden boxes were used for seats and floor boards on the neighborhood cut down that we used to go to the river, ball games and any other fun things (provided we could keep it running) we could do. We always had casing head fuel and a model A or T engine was simple to work on. How did we survive? As I look back it could not possibly have been that much fun.

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  9. Wooden boxes were used for the floor boards and seats for the neighborhood cutdowns we made. We went to the river, ball games and just anything else (provided we could keep it running). We always had casing head fuel and the Model T and A engines were simple to work on. I do not know how we survived and looking back it could not possibly have been that much fun.

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  10. Sorry about the double post. I had wandered off to Lala land of the past.

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  11. Refrigerator boxes (cardboard) were brought home by my dad for us to make a clubhouse, boat, whatever. Who needs toys?!

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  12. Ahhh the wooden crate. Same as I spoke about in another previous photo. Brings back memories.
    These days I do not think kids develop and imagination, they are provided with one (be it as it may).
    Also as a kid we had a backyard that was about 400 feet long. About a 150 of it was my grandmother's garden and the rest was cut off with a white picket fence. Behind that fence was nothing but high grass. As a kid the grass was enourmous! We went in there and we were in a 'jungle'....a 'fort'....we played 'war'. It was our own world and no one could see us!!
    Decades later I went back. Stood on the back porch as an adult and realized.....my grandmother could see where we were and everything we were doing. Darn!

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  13. A new washing machine box would last us a long time as a fort, and secret hide out....until our mothers would call us in !
    Big boxes were fun !

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