Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Shoshone




This picture was taken in 1899, and shows a Shoshone Indian named Heebe-tee-tse. I do not know much about the Shoshone Indians.

6 comments:

  1. He reminds me of some of the ancient Pharaohs of Egypt. Seti the First or maybe Rameses.

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  2. I was raised in the area of the Shoshone. The history was all around me. Loved it.

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  3. There is something special about these portraits - a sense of "this is who I am, whether you like it or not" - that is almost hypnotic.

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  4. whether the photographers planned it or not, portraits of our native americans always seem to be larger than life to me.

    I grew up in Minnesota, home territory to both the Souix and the Chippewa.

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  5. On the Shoshones, they are a people who were native to Wyoming and who ranged into Utah, Idaho, Montana and Colorado in the pre horse era. When they first encountered the horse, they were expanding out eastward on the prairie in Wyoming. The first group of Shoshones to adopt the horse were the Comanche, with that term, "Comanche", meaning "the arguers" in that language. They were the arguers as they argued for horse adoption, which the majority of the tribe opposed at first. The horse, of course, radically altered the lifestyles of the first Shoshone to adopt them. The majority of the Shoshones later adopted horses as well, and they were allies of the United States during the Indian Wars, even participating in Crook's campaign of 1876. They asked for a reservation in the 1860s, which resulted in the Wind River Reservation, which they now share for historical reasons with the Arapahoes, a people with a significantly different history. Before I move on, I'll note that the last Shoshones to go onto the Reservation were the Mountain Shoshones, sometimes called the Sheepeaters, a very small reclusive branch of the tribe that kept to the mountains.

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  6. The shoshone Indians were amongst one of the largest Indian Tribes in North America. They are very close relatives to the Ute, Pauite, Bannock, Goshute, Comanche, Hopi, and numerous california tribes. Their territory was from south of Great Falls, MT, to the colorado/ AZ/ NM border, to the hole eastern border of California. They have a great terriotry and are well documented as the Snake Indians. Most people do not know that, as they Shoshone identified themselves by bands, but traded and allied, as well as fought amongst one another and other tribes. The Shoshone are a great confederacy with California, Nevada, Utah, Oregon, Wyoming, Idaho, Colorado, and Oklahoma as territories of trade and travel.

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