Friday, June 29, 2012

Water for the Army



Today's picture was taken in 1864 near Fredericksburg, Virginia. It shows a soldier from the Army of the Potomac drawing water for the troops. It looks like his cart has water barrels, so he probably has a pretty big job each day drawing the water. I would imagine providing water for an army with tens of thousands of troops was no small logistic feat.

OK, now for the moment you have all been waiting for . . . the results of Project HAO . . . wait for it . . . waaaaaaaait for it . . . . SUCCESS


Yes, we struck very good water down at about 75 feet. Now the next step is that we have to lower concrete culverts down the well to serve as lining for about the bottom 15 feet of the well. Then, the question is, do we let the children draw their water with a plastic bucket or do we provide them with a dandy hand pump, allowing them to not only have water for themselves, but perhaps also provide water for needy folks in the area.


27 comments:

  1. Pump! Pump! Pump! I'm totally not crying! *sniff*

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  2. Good job!

    Graham in St. John's

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  3. Isn't that something. A person really doesn't think about what it takes to make an army run. Things like if I have 100 men under me or a 1,000 men, how much water do I need to supply every day? How many loves of bread do I have to bake every day? How many cows do I butcher every day? Plus you have to find these items.
    I guess that is why they had foraging parties go out everday.
    It would be bad enough just taking care of 1 person, much less the complete army.
    And then there is the getting the food to the troops.
    What a headache all that must have been back in the Civil War days.

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    1. That is suppose to be "loaves of bread"

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  4. Very well done on your well.
    Good job Jacob.

    Yes, they should name it either Jacob's well or PJM's well. I vote for "PJM's WELL". It was your inspiration to dig it, your drive to get it done, your organization, and I'm guessing your pocket book paid for it.

    PJM I salute you, excellent job.

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  5. Hey, Maybe you can rent a nice "Z lift" to put the concrete culverts into the well and then you can drive it around the compound and get us some photos from way up high.
    And maybe use it to jump a trench.

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    1. Dadd, there is no telling how many thousands of miles we are from a good Z-lift. Nope the culverts will have to go down with manual labor and ropes.

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    2. There you go, taking all the fun out of it. You do know I was joking about renting a "Z" lift. I was just referring to the fun you had when you were building your green house.

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  6. Good job! I vote for a pump!

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  7. Hallelujah! Praise God. And thanksgiving to you and Jacob!

    Is one of the three guys with you Jacob? Who are they? Maybe a dumb question, but why wouldn't you line the entire well with culvert?

    In my well, the PVC pipe in the bottom section had holes in the sides the entire length, as the water entered the pipe through all these holes, not just from the bottom.

    Are you going to build a structure around the top of the well? and a platform to walk on?

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    1. The guy in the red shirt is the one who started the orphanage. The other two were helping with digging well. Jacob is in the bottom of the well and not in the picture. The concrete culverts weigh 1,100 pounds each, so it is an incredibly difficult job to get just three in the bottom of the well. They are not needed higher up as the soil is packed clay which does not need reinforcement.

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  8. Pump! and I am not teary eyed either. **sniff** I still can't believe Jacob dug 75 feet straight down with a hand shovel. Incredible!!

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  9. I, too, salute you and Jacob. With your othe help there you all have done a wonderful thing for that village. It will repay you by helping the kids healthier and with the additional time from not having to haul water, they can begin to increase their study time. Of course, there will be more time for play also.

    My faith in mankind has greatly increased with this project. Will you and Jacob become a not-for profit well drilling company now? Eventually it could become Jacob's company. The possibilities are endless.

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    1. Al, my hope is to help these children be as self sufficient as possible, so when I exit the picture they are better able to enjoy the basic essentials of life like having clean water, a garden for food, and then perhaps some other projects before I leave. One of the lovely Ms. EAM's friends has been out here this month, and she is going back and will try to organize a "Deny Yourself" Christmas in Kenya where a team comes out with the goal of giving each child a clean bed, mosquito net, clean bedding, warm blankets, and paint their rooms. So, hopefully we can keep the project moving.

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  10. Is Jacob digging deeper, or just trimming up the well walls?

    There you go, you and Jacob can start your own company digging wells.
    I'm sure he will get better and faster the more of them he digs, and you can watch and smoke cigars. Every project needs someone to watch and smoke cigars

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    1. Hey, I like the part where I sit and watch and smoke cigars, and someone else digs. Jacob is a professional well digger. He probably grows Maze and then digs wells on the side. It is amazing how much work people do here, and how hard they work, and make the most out of the least.

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  11. Well done! But now what will you do with the rest of your summer? And I'm curious what you've done with your driver. Wouldn't he normally be in this picture too?

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    1. Nate . . . driver took the picture. He does normally work his way into the photograph. Driver's name is nick. He is a good driver and has a clean car. A ride anywhere is $2. Very honest and trustworthy guy. What I like about taxi service here is that you call your driver, and he comes and gets you. You do not call a dispatcher. If your driver is busy, he calls someone and sends them for you. A much better system in my mind than US system.

      As far as the rest of the summer, you will just have to stay tuned!

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  12. Loved watching the journey to get these kids water- you all are incredible. I might have teared up a little too :) My vote is for a pump!

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  13. Praise God for what is truly a job well done.

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  14. I am beyond thrilled that you have hit water, and these children now have enough to drink and grow a garden for food. We forget just how important water is to our life every day. I agree that a pump is the best bet, but until you can get your hands on suitable pipe (I vote for PVC) something along the lines of what we would think of as a wishing well would suffice. Too tall for the kids to fall into and all that good stuff.

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  15. A pump? Like a hand pump? After just recently completing windmill week you should be thinking of using wind power.

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  16. What a warm, fuzzy moment! Great job!

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  17. Congratulations my friend ! Well done !

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  18. Whow!! what a wonderful story and how wonderful that you are there. It was great to see water in the picture today. I bet everyone is very happy. I know I am. To God be the glory and thanksgiving that He sent you!! lam IL Tell us how to help and where with the bedding and such.

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