Thursday, June 21, 2012

Milk Man




Today's picture was taken in 1903 and it shows a milk delivery wagon. The picture was taken in 1903, and looks like a similar cart to the one pictured yesterday.

9 comments:

  1. The big difference is, if it rains he can put up his top and stay dry.

    I wonder if that is a "Yellow Brick Road" he is on?

    The other horse looked a lot better cared for than this one does. But it might be at the end of a hard day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That does look like a poor bedraggled horse compared to yesterdays. His ribs seem to be over exposed.

      Delete
  2. Again beautiful buildings in the background; perhaps they are in the French Quarter in New Orleans?

    The other horse did look healthier. The ribs are visible on this one, the front legs just don't look right and his coat is dull and ratty looking.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I was going to comment on the poor horse too, but I see everybody noticed the same thing. It was probably hot as the dickens too, just like here in S. Ontario!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I was pitying the horse as well.
    Any horse experts care to comment? Also, the cart leaf suspension system, combined with the tires, seems to imply lots of shaking. Maybe cushions on the seat help a bit for the driver, but how far could this cart carry cream and avoid delivering butter, I wonder?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe that was the plan in the end, butter

      Delete
  5. When my children were babies, I put them on whole milk when I weaned them (6-9 months), and on long road trips there would be little yellow flecks in the milk, where the cream had become incorporated into the milk and then turned to butter. From what I understand (I'm not THAT old) on pioneer trips, they would simply tie the butter curn to the side of the covered wagon and the butter would "come" without having to stop and actually churn it. I used my electric mixer; it would be whipped cream first, and then begin to settle out. I'd pour off the whey and keep mixing until it was pure butter.

    Regarding illness caused by raw milk - most people north of Baltimore who want milk go up to the Amish to get it, and I figure they know what they're doing. In order to get a license to sell creamery milk in Maryland you really have to jump through some hoops, so it's probably safe. As it happens, PA is closer than the nearest "local" creamery.

    Does anybody remember when even pasteurized milk had cream on top. Here, it came in "baby faced" bottles, so you could pour off the cream without disturbing the milk in the lower part of the bottle.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This picture is in New Orleans. Yesterday was out in St Bernard Parish. Between East Orleans and Chalmette.

    ReplyDelete