Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Hauling Water



Back in the day, getting the water to the surface was just part of the problem. You then had to haul the water to the house. This picture shows a Hispanic woman near Taos, New Mexico hauling water to the house. You can see the old style bucket well in the background.

Project HAO continues! First, I should do a little book keeping . . . our contest was to guess the name of the well digger. Myrtle was the first with the correct answer, his name is Jacob. Interesting! So, this could be called "Jacob's Well", and the ladder inside . . . "Jacob's Ladder".


I am pleased to report we are now 70 feet deep. If you look at the well hole, Jacob is no longer visible, but you can hear the faint "thump, thump, thump" of his hand spade digging ever deeper.

As we started getting deeper, the issue becomes oxygen. The carbon dioxide exhaled by Jacob settles in the bottom of the well, so soon there is no oxygen in the lower regions of the well. Jacob must judge when he is losing consciousnesses, and come up for air. People on the top drop banana leaves down the hole. Supposedly the leaves give off oxygen, but I  also wonder if perhaps the big leaves stir the air  on the way down and mix  some oxygen down to the bottom of the hole. Perhaps we should rename the project, "Dig to China". Actually, China is not opposite Kenya, so this would be "Dig to US".

12 comments:

  1. I hope you hit water soon!

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  2. That is truly amazing. Any idea of how far he has to go till he hits water? Are there any other wells in the area that you can judge the distance by? The soil looks like hard packed red clay, is that correct? Does Jacob know he has fans over here cheering him on? Too many questions?

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  3. Would it be practical to build an old blacksmith's type bellows to pump oxygen down the hole with a hose? Sticks and fabric could be used.

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  4. I would like to echo the questions asked by Dave 107.

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  5. What keeps the possibility of wall collapse at bay?

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  6. This guy must have some experience digging wells. You would have to in order to be able to go down 70 feet by hand. That is getting pretty deep for a hand dug well with no shoring. He must have some idea of how deep he has to go to hit water in this area. An OSHA inspector would faint dead away if he happened on something like this in the US.

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    1. I would faint dead away if it was me at the bottom of that hole!

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  7. I see only one rope. The rubble must be removed by a bucket tied to that, but then that must also leave Jacob down there with no lifeline should he misjudge and lose conciousness!

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  8. Actually, the opposite of Kenya is the center of the Pacific Ocean (lots of water there).

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  9. Studying more use of wheelbarrows for hauling water in Haiti. Interesting that Google has over seven billion images indexed for water and over six mission for wheelbarrow. It is no easy task to carry about 40 #s of water in a bucket for a long distance, possibly 2 to 4 times a day.

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  10. Correction: six million Interested in any old photos of wheelbarrows being used for hauling water.

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