Thursday, May 24, 2012

Wind Charger




Today's picture was taken in 1939 near Corpus Christi, Texas. The man is setting up a wind charger. The info on the picture said that he was a squatter, so I wonder if he is living in his car, and perhaps scavenged the generator from the car (note that the hood of the car is open). 

9 comments:

  1. What a great idea. Move some place, and to have electricity and lights you set up a makeshift wind charger using your generator from your car. Then if you are going to go someplace put it back in and set up someplace else. But you would think that he would probable get a second one to make it easier.

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  2. I love his makeshift ladder also.
    It does look like there are some buildings in the back ground.
    When I first look at the photo, I thought it was some kind of fancy windcharger, then I realized that was a man hanging on to it.

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  3. Another great picture! So much to analyze. I like the car. Looks like the Chevy Tahoe of it's time, very early SUV. My best guess is it's a 1930 Plymouth. If this guy does live in his car, atleast he has room to stretch out. That makeshift ladder he is using looks like an old cast iron cook stove perhaps.

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  4. The car is almost as tall as the platform he is standing on. He could have parked the car near the tower climb up on othe roof and then get on that little platform. Might have been easier. OSHA wouldn't have a problem with that.

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    Replies
    1. Only thing is, the anchor cables would have been in the way.

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  5. Just goes to prove that Joe McGee was alive and well in 1939.

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  6. Back in the 30s, so many times folks didn't have money for a "second" anything, like a second car generator. Might not even have had the money for "first" item. My folks told how during the 30s, with no electricity in rural Iowa, my folks had a car battery and the neighbor's had a radio and once a week they got together and hooked the radio up to the car battery so they could listen to the radio shows like Amos and Andy.

    Now that is hard for me to understand and my grandchildren have NO idea, not a clue of anything remotely close to no electricity, no battery, no radio or TV or phone.

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