Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Mystery Device



What in the world are they doing week continues here at OPOD with this picture. Can you guess what the guy is doing?

Now to clear up yesterday's picture . . . many of you had humorous comments, and many were close on your guesses. The picture shows a government light bulb tester. I dont know about you, but I know that I sleep better at night knowing the government is on top of this.

14 comments:

  1. instron testing machine. strength of materials work

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  2. I can not venture a guess as to what he is doing . A thousand things came to mind, but nothing popped out. I will wait until the ENM posts the correct answer, or Tracy. But I'm putting my money on the ENM.

    But one thing I do like about this photo is that the man is wear a suit and tie in a place with heavy machinery

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  3. Looks like he is testing a gyroscope or some such thing.

    But perhaps this is another WPA (Works Project Administration, or the We Poke Along, as my mother says it was called) project from FDR's New Deal. This gizmo is to keep out of work opera singers off the streets and there by reducing crime. The robberies by the opera singers were astounding- "Your money or I'll sing" The sopranos would hit a high E flat and break the glass in store fronts and rob the establishments blind. Something had to be done.
    A rather clever bureaucrat came up with this brilliant plan.The newly employed opera singer, who by some strange chance now votes for Democrats, sings into the round device and the strength of his voice is measured by how much the pistons are moved. The voices are recorded and to used for burglar alarms, air raid sirens and to keep raccoons out or corn. Absolutely worthless, like much of the WPA projects.

    By the way the singer is Constantine Fortissimo, third cousin of J.E. Keefauver, the paint watcher.

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    1. Well I was waiting for the ENM's version, but yours was very enlighting also.

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  4. He is testing the breaking point of different gauges of wire.

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  5. The gentlemen is calibrating the force measuring system in this compression testing machine. It is an oldy. The force read out is probably by hydraulic pressure read on the gauge on the right side of the photo

    This would be considered a very early Instron, before Instrons existed.

    Mike

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  6. How did Miss EAM get malaria anyway? Was the vaccination useless against that strain or didn't she get one in the first place?

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    1. There is really not a vaccination for Malaria. If you are going over for a visit, they give you an antibiotic which can help prevent some forms of it, but if you move over there, you can not take the antibiotic continuously. So, people who live and work over there will get Malaria. The strain going around Western Kenya this year was particularly nasty, and many of her native African friends ended up in the hospital.

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  7. I do believe that Nate must have slept in today! :)

    Above we see Robert Charles Buchwald III with the first patented Bumblebee Vertical Lift-O-Matic used to measure bee lift strength. Recently, grandson of R.C., apiologist Robert Buchwald and fellow scientist Robert Dudley of the Animal Flight Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley (Dudley is also a Research Associate at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama), tested the accuracy of two different methods of calculating an insect’s load lifting ability on bumblebees (Bombus impatiens). They found that bumblebees can lift (in addition to their own bodies), on average, 53 percent of their body weight. Yet one of the methods they tested underestimated the bees’ strength by 18 percent. Use of R.C.'s Lift-)-Matic was eventually replaced by the asymptotic method, which involves attaching a long string of tiny, evenly spaced weights to a bee’s petiole or midsection. This change was made after a few over zealous lab assistant's work came under scrutiny. Recent journals however predict the return of the Lift-O-Matic for upcoming studies on the African Killer Bee.

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    1. Did they take into consideration the weight of the string that was hook to the bee?
      Best explanation yet.

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    3. (Darn typos)

      Most defintely DADD. The linear mass density of the beaded strings was based on bee size. Buchwald & Dudley used two strings, one for which each of the two bead groups closest to the bee weighed 30±0.5·mg, whereas another nine consecutive bead groups each weighed 15±0.5·mg. For the second string, each consecutive bead group weighed 30±0.5·mg. They also investigated the effects of string linear mass density on load-lifting by individual bees. One ‘thick’ string (linear density mass for the string alone of 2.1·mg·cm–1) and one ‘thin’ string (linear density mass density of 0.3·mg·cm–1) were used with each of two euglossine species (Eg. imperialis, El. nigrita). On each string type, the first bead group began 3.5·cm from the point of petiolar attachment, with subsequent bead groups consecutively spaced at 2·cm intervals. Bead groups used with Eg. imperialis each weighed 15±0.5·mg, whereas bead groups for El. nigrita weighed 30±0.5·mg. They tested each bee with a thick and a thin beaded string and alternated string order in consecutive lifting bouts.

      By the way, I think someone should go over to Nate's and make sure he's okay... :)

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  8. Those big curly Q things (humongous Slinkys) must be shock absorbers. Soooo testing the resistance of somthing or other.

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  9. Obviously, this is a donut hole calibrator.

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