Friday, April 27, 2012

Moon Walk



I believe mankind hit its peak on July 20, 1969, the day that Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. It was a "first" to beat all other firsts. Sure after that we went back to the moon a few more times, and we have done other interesting things since then, but I believe nothing will ever top this day.

Today, we do not have the ability to return to the moon. The truth is, we do not even have the ability to put men into low earth orbit any more. Even though technology has advanced in many areas since 1969, I doubt we will ever be able to put men on the moon again. It costs lots of money, takes lots of hard work, and requires lots of people to agree on something. 

July 20th, 1969 . . . the peak of human civilization?

13 comments:

  1. Nah, USA USA USA. Private companies will be able to do that in a few years. It'll take the commies and socialists decades to figure that out.

    Heck, by the time we get back up there we'll have *MINING* equipment with us.

    USA USA USA.

    Just my view.

    -XC

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  2. I remember watching the Apollo news on my Grandparents' TV. That was a long time ago.

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  3. Remember, NEVER say Never.

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  4. Yes, landing a man on the moon has to be the peak of human civilization but close to that I'd say are the accomplishments of Voyager 1 and 2 which are just now leaving the solar system and entering interstellar space. Launched in 1977, it's 11.2 billion miles away! NASA can still communicate with it and control the thrusters!

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  5. If we didn't have such a bunch of neanderthal, non-thinking, idiots, in government since 1969, we could be up there now with mining equipment and goodness knows what else?

    We are a nation of self-centered nincompoops who elect a bunch of self-serving politicians and then stand back and complain about what they do.

    For those of you who aren't paying attention - this post is absolute proof of the above statements!

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  6. and I should have added: "or don't do!"

    Silly me!

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  8. Well, Michael, we've pretty thoroughly messed up one planet, so I suppose we might as well put the effort into ruining another, instead of fixing the one we have. And if we start mining on the moon, we could possibly set it off balance and cause who-knows-what sort of havoc all over the universe. Sounds like a grand plan, indeed.

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  9. I think Expat has part of the answer in that it will now be the private, profit-driven community that will carry on the space program, but for many of the wrong reasons.

    We will not be exploring for scientific reasons and we will not take care of what we find for scientists to look over later. Sort of like firing practice mortar shells at the Sphinx in Egypt. Rather, we will be looking for marketable water (a real future market here) and minerals that can be used in the new order to support the industrial complex we will become.

    A real concern to me is that we will be talking in Chinese simply because they will be the ones with the population and money (mostly ours) to literally run the world.


    Much of the above could be postponed if we could elect a new congress and senate made up of reasonable men (of both parties) with a disposition to act rather than sit dumbly by as the country sinks in a pool of indecision with the gumption removed.

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  10. Yeah, we haven't done anything of any note since 1969. Imagine, for instance, we had developed the technology to connect every person on the planet so that we could all share news, opinions, and information instantly. Pictures, lectures, music, and video could be viewed on small devices that you could use anywhere without wires. You could find and buy just about anything and have it delivered to your door the next day. Yeah, too bad civilization peaked in 1969 with that cold war-inspired, dead end space race. We might have done something big.

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  11. I wish I had been around back then to witness and feel the sense of pride, suspense, and every other emotion at the time as Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. The wonder of it all...WOW!

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  12. Just fwiw, to a certain extent, it would be worth remembering that part of this accomplishment came due to the Cold War. Sure, we were united in the goal, but part of that is because we were taking a pounding from the Soviets in space, and had a huge fear that the Soviets would make it to the moon prior to us, essentially proving to the world that capitalism and democracy was on the way out. Many people, even here in the US, believed that.

    That entire episode, therefore, caused a unification of Congress in a way that only wars can achieve, and the Cold War was a war, and it united the American people to spend accordingly. As part of that, we were pretty willing to fund government projects that we paid for, to some degree, through an inflationary economy.

    When we won the war, that can of unity came apart. It's proven to be nearly impossible since the fall of the Soviet Union to achieve political unity on darned near anything.

    I haven't lost hope by any means, but I do feel that right now we have just about the worst set of public servants the nations been afflicted with in eons, maybe ever. It's stunning.

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  13. Just fwiw, to a certain extent, it would be worth remembering that part of this accomplishment came due to the Cold War. Sure, we were united in the goal, but part of that is because we were taking a pounding from the Soviets in space, and had a huge fear that the Soviets would make it to the moon prior to us, essentially proving to the world that capitalism and democracy was on the way out. Many people, even here in the US, believed that.

    That entire episode, therefore, caused a unification of Congress in a way that only wars can achieve, and the Cold War was a war, and it united the American people to spend accordingly. As part of that, we were pretty willing to fund government projects that we paid for, to some degree, through an inflationary economy.

    When we won the war, that can of unity came apart. It's proven to be nearly impossible since the fall of the Soviet Union to achieve political unity on darned near anything.

    I haven't lost hope by any means, but I do feel that right now we have just about the worst set of public servants the nations been afflicted with in eons, maybe ever. It's stunning.

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