Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Shucking



This picture gives us a little more detail on the finer points of corn shucking. It looks like he has a little peg in his hands, and grabs the corn husk between the peg and his thumb. I can see this would be easier if you were going to be doing this all day than using the thumb and the index finger. Perhaps someone who has done this for real could shed a little light on the topic.

7 comments:

  1. He is using a tool that is a cross between a knife and hook. My husband has 2 of them that he picked up from an antique store. They do make it much easier to shuck the corn.

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  2. Dried corn husks are very abrasive and this tool can save even the toughest hands. For me getting the dried corn off the cob was worse. Even with hands that could pick up a burning ember would flake off after a while.

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  3. A few days ago there were questions about why the corn stalks were bundled,(called shocks) and tied. This was done to keep the stalks dry as they were later used as bedding in the barn. Today the stalks are chopped and plowed under. The stalks had to be removed from the field for plowing.

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  4. It looks like it and the gloves would save the hands a lot of misery.

    I have never husked more than a bushel or two of corn at a time. When I was a kid I helped with lots of similar tasks.

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  5. John Deere makes a nice machine that makes corn husking easy, but it is kind of expensive, way lot more than a corn hook, called a combine.

    Had a hell of a time with the new word verification---almost impossible to read one of them. Maybe that is why the comments are down. Had to do 5 or 6 until I could get one that I could read.

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  6. oops. what happened. I lost a day. I thought this was 2/15 . . . but it must not be. Must still be 2/14. Happy Valentines Day! My dad wrote a newspaper article on this subject and expounded at length on shucking corn . . . but I've never seen it done and it didn't stick in my brain. I'm pretty sure there's still a contest at the Iowa State Fair every August tho. In the old day's it was a necessity and an art.

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  7. I too have never had grits but that recipe PJM talked about sounds fantastic. My mom used to make the best chilli corn carni around and her corn chowder (thats chowda for us New England folk LOL)was really good. My older son hates corn, can't stand the smell or taste. I don't know what it is with that kid. He will actually get sick to his stomach if he even smells corn on the cob. Yesterday Grandpa mentioned that the stalks were bundeled together so they could dry and become bedding in the barn. I always wondered what that was for, thanks for the info, Grandpa. Seems like it's evolved into Fall decoration. The farm near my house sells them as decorations to tie on your mailbox. Corn week is fun, everything ya ever wanted to know about corn huh.

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