Wednesday, November 16, 2011

PIke's Peak Prospector



This is my favorite photo so far this week. It was taken around 1900, and it shows an old prospector and his cabin. He is working in the Pike's Peak area of Colorado. I like love the old stove, but wonder why it is not INSIDE the cabin. You also have to wonder what is in the little black jug.

13 comments:

  1. why is the stove outside isnt it cold there

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  2. The first time I went into the Cripple Creek area was in 1947. The population was about maybe40 to 50. All the roads in were rock and narrow. Victor was even less populated. There were diggings every few feet and old autos were still in fairly good condition out on the hills. Some had been used to power equipment. I too had a Brownie box camera at the time. They took very sharp photos with the film of that day. The last time I went through Cripple Creek it had been taken over and in my opnion destroyed. I have never been back.

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  3. In this small cabin even in Colorado the heat must have been too much in the summer time while cooking.

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  4. It looks like summer. The door is open and he is not wearing a coat. cooking inside might make the cabin too hot.
    HAT

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  5. The stove looks like a cook stove...maybe he was just ahead of his time...the first on his street with a backyard kitchen...

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  6. The stove looks like a cook stove...maybe he was just ahead of his time...the first on his street with a backyard kitchen...

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  7. That stove could have been used to heat his gold. They did use mercury to remove gold dust from the ore. Then they would heat the gold/mercury mixture to vaporize the mercury and just leave the gold.
    They learned that it was a very dangerous practice if they happen to inhale the fumes.
    By the way they still use mercury to remove gold from the ore. Gold dust will attach itself to the mercury and is a lot easier to recover then.
    And that little black canister might contain mercury.
    It doesn't look like a drinking jug, it doesn't really have neck on it to wrap your lips around

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  8. Living in a cabin like that is like living in a tent. In other words, you sleep inside, but do most of your activities outside. The inside is dark, damp, and likely stinks.

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  9. We had a stove like that when I was a kid. Daddy always took it down and stored it in the summertime. Mama would cook beans or soup on it in the wintertime, after all it was already hot and it had burner lids on top.
    Maybe he used it to cook on outside to keep from heating up the cabin during the summer.

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  10. Hello Mr PJM,
    Here is a link to Vimeo to a small preview of a Documentary about Fordlandia, a village built by Henry Ford in the end of 20's in the banks of Tapajós River, in Amazonia. I think you 'll find at least interesting some that old footages of the 20's.
    link: http://vimeo.com/13042030

    Greetings from Brazil

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  11. He may have, with some help, moved the stove inside in the winter.

    I wonder what he is looking at, or if he is just posing and looking at nothing in particular.

    The dog behind him is interesting.

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  12. Hmmm...He's holding a heavy hammer and wedge in one hand, and an even heavier hammer and three other tools I can't identify in the other hand...I get the feeling it would be unwise to arm-wrestle this guy, even if he is a smoker. Is that a corn-cob pipe? Looks homemade, anyway.

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  13. tinhamos um fogão como esse,lembro que era branco com umas flores azuis.bons tempos.

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