Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Panning for Gold



Today we feature another old photograph of prospectors. This picture was taken in 1940 near Pinos Altos in New Mexico. I wonder if this was a hobby, or how they made their living.

10 comments:

  1. I love that Willys-Overland wagon in the back ground. It was the the unit that the Willys Jeep came from.

    I would kind of think they were not to serious about it. They have clean clothes and not threadbare at all. With the Willys-Overland Wagon in the back ground I would say they drove to the site for the day.
    Just my guess, I could be wrong.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Love these photos of the old west. My favorite time in history. And OHOH; I feel a picture embargo coming

    ReplyDelete
  3. Listen you guys, I try and do my part every day.
    Remember to post something, even if it is to say "no comment today"

    You got to know it is a hard chore to post something each and every day.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I love this site! I visit eveery day.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I agree with DADD, they look to clean to be at it for a living.
    None of these prospectors have mules. I like mules, although I have never owned one.

    ReplyDelete
  6. They are probably like my son. He goes out for a week-end, and pulls out a little gold. if he find a nice place, he may come back with his bigger equipment.

    ReplyDelete
  7. It looks like they are only there for the day, doin' a little prospectin'. If they were seriously mining, there would be more stuff and junk laying around, at least a shovel or two. I think they took this picture so they could show all of their friends that they had been up doing a little panning. It they had claim there, they might have been up doing their "assessment work". It used to be to keep your claim active, you had to do $100.00 worth of "improvements" every year. My grandfather had many claims up in the gold country of California around Alleghany, and most of his assessment work, unless he hit a pay streak, was working on the road going to the place. This was back in the 20's and 30's. Couple of time he hit it good, and he would run a drift (a horizontal shaft vs. a vertical one), and if it was a good producer, he would bring in the ball mills and separators and all the other stuff he needed and set up shop right there at the mine. There are still several old abandoned sites up there where his old metal is slowly rusting away. Probably couldn't find them again if I tried. It was still there at several places in the 60's, though. My dad was alive then, and he knew how to get to those place. I was just a kid and didn't pay much attention, wish now that I had. There, that ought to keep the picture embargo at bay for a few days!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. My grandmother was a sourdough from Nome and married, late in life, another sourdough. His name was Earl "Jessie" James. He had claims all over the Alleghany, Camptonville , Pike area. He had a house in Pike. I used to go up there in the summer. He had a neighbor Mr Gilmore who had live there forever. He used to show me around. One time, I think it was in 1955 we went into the bar in Alleghany and a couple of old timers asked me where I was from. I said LA. One of them said I was there once during the war, didn't like it and never went back. Jessie's little house is still there in Pike,, right next to the old schoolhouse.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Here in NW Georgia it is very much a hobby. The local outdoor YMCA property once had a gold mine before the Civil War. After the CW, gold mining declined, but people kept pecking at it. The local science museum holds workshops where the local gold panning club shows how to do it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. click on this photo and enlarge. I love the clarity, the sharpness of it. My grandmother and her brother,around 1900, invested their hard earned savings in a Brownie camera and developed their own photos. A lot of their photos are sharp and crisp to this day (unlike our family photos from 1976 but that's another story). My mother had that camera into the 1940s, maybe even early 50s and still taking quality photos. Imagine! (i'm whining because my 2 yr old digital is defunct/dead/gone)

    ReplyDelete