Friday, October 7, 2011

Old Train Station



We finish out the week with this picture of a train station in Gardiner, Montana. The picture was taken in 1905. This is a classic photograph, and looks like something straight out of a John Wayne movie. 

I am sorry to see train week come to an end, and I am sad that these magnificent old steam locomotives have pretty much faded into the past. Hopefully I will be able to take another ride on the Durango and Silvertaon or the Cumbres and Toltec one day soon.

11 comments:

  1. Other than being really nostalgic, steam engines weren't that great.
    Don't get me wrong, I think they are GREAT. But they were dirty things to ride on. Can you imagine riding 100 miles, 500 miles, or 2000 miles behind one of those sooty, choking smoke, cinder producing machines.
    They weren't very efficient, took tons of maintenance. They had to stop often to water up and fuel up. In the winter time they were terrible cold, the car were cold with just a little wood stove to heat it. In the summer the car were HOT, because you couldn't open the windows because the smoke and soot would pour inside.
    But there I am comparing a Model "T" car to a modern day car. We love to see the old cars in the parades, but we wouldn't want to go across country in one.

    I too am sorry to see STEAM ENGINE week over, but maybe another week in the future.

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  2. Yes, this has been a great week. I hope that you will have more weeks of pictures of old things like this, not just portraits.

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  3. I think the thing I miss most about steam trains is the whistle. Nothing else on earth sounds like a steam whistle. I grew up in the age of diesel, so my little experience with steam is limited to watching the excursion runs in the summer, and the old trains kept running at various historical villages. But the sound of a steam whistle travels for miles, and always got my attention.
    Graham in St. John's

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  4. This is my favorite of the week. The log framed station, the wagons backing up to load up on supplies coming in, the wooden walkway, the passenger waiting down the way...all of this industry in what appears to be the middle of nowhere. This really speaks to how important trains were in the development of the west.

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  5. The train and the station are super nifty, but if you look closely the grocery wagon is just OK.

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  6. This Northern Pacific Railway Station at Gardiner was designed by Robert Reamer to serve as a gateway entrance to Yellowstone. Reamer is the same architect who designed the landmark Old Faithful Inn. Other pictures of this station highlight the incredible looking platform. Unfortunately this structure was razed in 1954.

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  7. If you MAP QUEST Gardiner, MT., you can still see where the track ran into town. There is a faint trail on the West side of the river. The tracks are gone but you still can make out the path where the tracks were

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  8. Ok now I want to go to Yellowstone and stay at the Old Faithful Inn! What a tremondous structure, just beautiful. That Robert Reamer had some talent.

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  9. Loved the pictures this week. I love to see people going about their business and wonder what they did for a living.

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  10. I think with all the feedback you can clearly see what most people are interested in. Real people and times. This has been a great week and those old engines were not so bad. I rode the trains many times and back then we did not know the soot, noise and heat and cold were so bad. It was a case of what you don't know won't hurt you. But!!!! air conditioning is nice. Still, I wish I could return to the wide open spaces of that time.

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