Monday, October 17, 2011

Coffee Pickers



Today's picture shows people picking coffee beans. The picture is from the early 1900's, and it was taken in Brazil. I wonder how coffee is picked today . . . is it still picked by people on ladders with bags on their shoulders? 

20 comments:

  1. So, where is Jaun Valdez when you need to ask him about picking bean.

    They do have mechanical harvesting machines but they take all the bean ripe or green,
    The preferred way is hand picking just the ripe beans

    DADD formally known as RTD

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  2. I did some reading on coffee bean harvesting.
    So I wonder who deceided to take the pit from a coffee cherry and roast it, then grind it up and then brew it into something to drink. HMMMMM?

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  3. Come on people, lets get some comments in. We don't want a photo embargo again, do we?
    Make a comment even if it is to say "No Comment"

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  4. How's the weather in ND?

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  5. The story I heard was once upon a time a shepard noticed his flock eating the bitter beans and then acting funny. So he tried the beans too.

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  6. Am contemplating having a second cup of coffee as I admire the picture. Beautiful morning here in Montréal.

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  7. T^he wind blew hard for the last 2 days, but just a nice breeze today. Sun is shining and about 55.

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  8. It alls has made me wonder jow certain food cane to be used.
    Did it go some thing like this. I saw Igor eat those berries and he didn't die, so let try them also.
    You know that cranbrries are quit bitter until you add some sugar, so why would you eat them again.

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  9. I'm sad to see the mystery photo contest fade away, but you are right.

    The espresso machine from the other is a beauty, a real work of art.

    Is coffee picking as bad as cotton picking?

    DADD, does that stand for Dads Against Daughters Dating? Shoot one and the rest will get the message.

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  10. Lots of "lookers" and only one poor soul working....Hmmmmm

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  11. Did you notice they are all children?

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  12. Myrtle, I got that name 30 years ago or even more. It was when video games first started to come out. My kids talked me into playing a game and I got high score on it. I was going to walk away, but the kids pressured me into signing my name. So I went to put down "DAD", but that was already taken, so I signed in with "DADD". Now my kids know if they see DADD I was there.
    A long story for some thing so simple.
    By the wasy the wind has picked up again, but not as bad as the last two days.
    DADD formally RTD

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  13. Olá,eu sou brasileira e aqui já se plantou muito café,agora restam poucas plantações.Nas grandes plantações se usam a colheitadeira,mas aqui ainda se colhe dessa forma.Quando era criança ia para a colheita de café,que depois de colhido ficava no sol para secar,depois triturado num pilão,torrado e depois moído.grande saudade dessa época da minha vida.

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  14. I love my coffee and I like this photo . . . but the real question today is why RTD is now DADD? are you incognito? are you skipping the country? are you on the lam?

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  15. Edis translation from Portuguese:
    Hello, I am Brazilian and here already planted a lot of coffee, now there are few large plantations plantações.Nas to use the combine, but here still reaps forma.Quando this kid went to the coffee harvest, which was harvested after the sun to dry, then crushed in a mortar, and then roasted moído.grande miss this time of my life

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  16. Sorry, used Google to translate and thought you all might also be interested... There were some errors on first translation.

    Hello, I am Brazilian and here already planted a lot of coffee, now there are few plantations. In large plantations to use the combine, but there still is harvested in this way. As a child went to the coffee harvest, which was harvested after the sun to dry, then crushed in a mortar, roasted and then ground. Miss this great time of my life.

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  17. #Herm
    So goverment style work ethic was around in those days as well.

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  18. obrigado pela tradução,eu sigo esse blog usando o tradutor da google,a tradução inglês para português é razoável,mas a português para o inglês não deve ser o mesmo.

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