Saturday, October 29, 2011

Canoes



Today's picture features a canoe rental stand in Arlington Beach park. The picture was taken in the 1920's. I have had lots of memorable times in canoes, and also some times I ended up tipping over. Any one else had any canoe adventures . . . please share them!

14 comments:

  1. Well, there was some confusion in yesterday's bus identification.
    So I did some Googling into the De Dion-Bouton busses, and CHRIS is correct. That emblem does belong to De Dion-Bouton company, who ever they are.

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  2. After my freshman year in college, I naively let my roommate talk me into a Maine canoe trip. When I told him I had never been in a canoe, he arranged for me to have an hour's practice on a lake in Asbury Park, NJ. There were to be 4 of us with two 21' foot canoes starting on Lake Chesuncook in Maine (about 40 miles above Moosehead, accessible only bt Scoot Paper Compant dirt logging roads.

    I was still expressing a lot of concerns about this trip, which involved a number of portages, and finishing with shooting the rapids, down the St. John's River into Canada. My roommate assured me that Boy Scouts took this exact same trip every summer, and that there was nothing to be concerned about.

    Luckily for me, one of our party of 4 had to drop out, so we decided to just canoe on Chesuncook, then climb to the top of Mt. Katadin (the beginning of the Appalachin Trail). While we were driving through New Hampshire. I found a brochure describing the Boy Scouts trip that was our original itinerary. It was then that I learned that the Boy Scouts underwent 3 months of training in canoe-manship before embarking on their journey. I was so glad the 4th person was unable to make it, and I had one of the best times of my life with the revised itinerary, which was a challenge for a greenhorn like me.

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  3. I have several canoeing stories to tell, but I will spread them over the coming week.
    I'll start with earning my canoeing merit badge in Boy Scouts. One of the things we had to do was to overturn my canoe in the middle of the lake, and them turn it up right again. Not as easy as a person may think when your feet don't touch any ground. First you have to try and fill the canoe with air while it is up side down, which will push out water.
    There are two ways of doing that. One is to that big gulps of air, go under the canoe and breath it out. The second way is to hang out side the canoe and grab hands full of air and splash it under the canoe. Sounds silly, but the splashing works fairly well. I found the big breaths work better for me, because I was a blow hard even back then.
    Then when you feel you have expelled enough water (water works as a vacuum). You get under the canoe and grab the side rails and push up and kick your feet real hard and if you can break the vacuum you try and toss the canoe right side up. You hope you get it over far enough that it doesn't sink again.
    Then you splash a bunch or water out of the upright canoe before you climb in and splash more out.
    It was easy to do when you did it with the aluminum one, but a lot harder with the older wood ones.

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  4. RJM Thank goodness for a change in your trip.
    And that folks, is how people get into trouble on the water.
    Even with my canoeing experience. I would have been a little hesitant about that trip.

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  5. That sounds like the Scouts, prepared for any old thing. We've done a few river rafting trips, but never an extended canoe trip yet. Although several of our Scouts have been talking about putting a Boundary Waters trip on our Troop itinerary. You can check out some pretty nifty Scout trips here: http://ntier.org

    In particular check out the links on site above: Adventures>Summer Adventures>Learn More

    The guys were most interested in the Northern Expeditions Canoe Base.

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  6. When I was an Explorer Scout, we entered the canoe race from above Lake Itaska, MN to Minneapolis, (or maybe it was St Paul) on the Mississippi. Where we started, you could actually step across the river in a single step. The race began in the Lake and proceeded south. It was a relay race and we had four teams. I think we came in second or third to last. Some of the teams were really good. We were just there for a good time, mostly, anyway. I remember my partner and I had to portage several times. They were all short runs and we were using Aluminum canoes. My brother still has our paddles we were given to commemorate our participation. That had to be 1960 or 1961, probably 61. I haven't been in a canoe since.

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  7. Sorry, no canoe stories.

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  8. When my sister and I were young, our parents used to take us to spend two weeks of every summer at "Pioneer Camp" in Bridgton, Maine.

    We stayed in a little log cabin and there were canoes on the lake (Woods Pond). I have some great pictures of us on the canoes - this is in the mid-1950s - and a picture of my mother some time in the late 1940s in a canoe, but I don't know where it was taken. I'd have to ask my dad.

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  9. When my sister and I were young, our parents used to take us to spend two weeks of every summer at "Pioneer Camp" in Bridgton, Maine.

    We stayed in a little log cabin and there were canoes on the lake (Woods Pond). I have some great pictures of us on the canoes - this is in the mid-1950s - and a picture of my mother some time in the late 1940s in a canoe, but I don't know where it was taken. I'd have to ask my dad.

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  10. My favourite was a privately organised three-day kayak trip down the Zambezi River - four of us in two two-person kayaks. No falling out or the crocodiles would get you, and always paddle well clear and to the shallow side of the hippos! Sadly, I have no photos, just wonderful memories.

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  11. Isn't there a canoe race down the river from San Antonio to the Gulf PJM?

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  12. Lorenzo,
    Have not heard about the canoe race, but I will look into it. Sounds interesting.
    PJM

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  13. My teenage daughter and I went canoeing a few years ago. I was the 5th time I had gone. Someone got tipped over and in rescuing them, we tipped over. The current was much stronger that it looked, and cold! I took all the strength I had to grab her and grab the rope thrown to us and pull us in. It was terrifying and could easily have had a very bad outcome. I understand now how people drown.
    That was 4 years ago and the daughter hasn't gone near a river since.

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  14. Used to go canoeing on the White River near Branson, Mo. The wake of passing speedboats would definitely cause us to rock! I think we always had at least 2 people in the canoe, and life jackets were required...good thing we had 2 people since I never did master the J-stroke.

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