Monday, October 10, 2011

Bed Time Radio Program



Today's picture is from Pie Town, New Mexico, and was taken about 1940. The mother and daughter are pictured listening to a radio above the bed at bed time. This family was one of the few in the area to have a radio, so they had many evening visitors.

I enjoyed reading the comments yesterday as people reminisced about old times listening to the radio. When I was growing up we barely got any TV reception, but I had an old Short Wave radio that would pick up radio stations all over the world. It was a little tricky to tune, and you often had to slam your hand on the top of it to get it to work. There was a program from Holland that was in English that I liked to listen to on Sunday evening. The radio had vacuum tubes, and would really heat up if you had it on for a while. I don't know if they even make shortwave radios any more.

14 comments:

  1. Just GOOGLE "new short wave radio" and you will see more of them than you care to count.
    They even make solar powered ones, that should make you very pleased

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  2. I remember my brother buying a kit to build his own short wave radio. It was so exciting when he got it "working". We would turn the dial forever it seemed. The stations would go in and out with lots of static. We were in the "Cold War" then, so foreign stations seemed very exciting to us. Great memories.

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  3. Alas, I was born after the Golden Age of radio. I listen to beautiful classical music on the radio. as well as the news and traffic reports. The weatherman can be particularly amusing.
    My friend, Bill is a ham radio operator; the SW radios are still out there.

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  4. There are still plenty of new shortwave radios in production. Two things detract a bit from the experience though:

    - there's too much electromagnetic interference these days, so reception is noisier than it was in my childhood

    - newer radios are all digitally tuned. This gives you station memories and is generally good if you know what you're looking for. But it is not very good for just exploring a band segment - analog tuning in a nice old radio is still king for that ...

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  5. I guess they must not have trusted that one calendar, I see they have two of them on the same wall.

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  6. I remember the radios we had was powered by a car battery, as we didn't have electricity. When the battery ran down, they would take it into town to be recharged..
    The shows we listened to were, "Mr Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons", "Lux Presents Hollywood" (which was the sound track of movies),& "My Favorite Husband". Our favorites were mysteries..

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  7. Digital tuning can be great. But it does cost a lot to get a radio capable of really good digital tuning. When I was in the military another lifetime ago, I used an R-390 HF receiver. Wonderful box! Oh, the memories!

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  8. Even though I was born in the TV generation black and white with 3 channels, one of my favorite gifts was a solid state shirt pocket 8 transistor radio. I'd sit there on the front stoop and listen to the ballgame. When us kids were customizing our stingray bikes with bananna seat and sissy bar, I thought mine was the coolest cause I had an american flag tied on to the sissy bar, baseball cards in the spokes, (held on with clothes pins) and that transistor radio was strapped to the handle bars. I could ride my bike and listen to the radio albeit the station went in and out with every turn. Yesterdays picture of Daddy and Daughter listening to the radio is a classic. Looks like Daddy just came home from work and daughter couldn't wait to jump up on his lap and listen to their favorite program together. One more thing, I went to the flee market 2 weeks ago and this one guy had an old Philco floor standing model for sale. Beautiful wood cabinet, and the radio sounded fantastic until you went to the back of it and saw it was gutted and someone stuck a modern radio in there. What a disapointment. No one was buying it and I could see in their faces they weren't happy at all.

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  9. Looks like it was more afternoon nap time....the clock apears to read 12:45.

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  10. Dave 107, those are my exact memories too! We bought our 8 trasnsistor radios at the Goodwill. They were cheap so I had several. At night I could catch stations onthe skip from Chicago (we lived in Lancaster, CA).
    The bike brings back memories too. My dad bought me a used orange Schwinn Stingray when I was 10. It was one of the ones that had the big 5 speed stick right in front of the seat, and if you were a boy, you cold injure yourself in a bad way! I think those were eventually removed for that reason.
    It looked like the one in this picture http://www.ebay.com/itm/1968-SCHWINN-ORANGE-KRATE5-SPEED-STINGRAY-BIKE-68-Bicycle-ORIG-CHAIN-GUARD-/110722675571?_trksid=p3284.m263&_trkparms=algo%3DSIC%26its%3DI%26itu%3DUCI%252BIA%252BUA%252BFICS%252BUFI%26otn%3D21%26pmod%3D360399463606%26ps%3D54

    Note the price!!!

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  11. Modern short-wave radios like that are typically called "World Band" radios, since you can pick up broadcasts from around the world, depending on the quality of the radio, atmospherics, where you are, and luck. If you look for world-band radios, you can find a bunch.

    When I was a kid, my father built me a crystal radio which ran didn't require any power to run (no battery, no plug). It only had enough power to run an old-fashioned set of headphones. Picked up two, maybe three local stations. I'd listen to at night in bed, and sometimes in the early morning before I got up. If I fell asleep with them on, my ears would get sore.

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  12. Not sure if I ever added a comment but please keep this site going. Even if I don't comment I enjoy keeping up to date with the site.

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  13. Anonymous said... "Looks like it was more afternoon nap time....the clock apears to read 12:45."
    I could be wrong but it looks to me to be 9:05. On the other hand there's a lot of (apparent) light coming through the windows.
    I was wrong once... that time I thought I had made a mistake!!

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  14. My father grew to manhood during the 1930s, during the Great Depression as he called it. He would tell how a neighbor had the car battery and he and my Mama had the radio and they would get together as often as they could to hook the two together and listen to Amos and Andy and all the others . . .

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