Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Moonshine Still



Today's picture was submitted by Mike Ciosek. The picture is from around 1910, and it show's Mike's great grandfather (Mikhaile Russak) being arrested by Russian police for running a still. I wonder what the punishment was for that crime?

This next picture was submitted by Nancy Hofmeister. It is a picture of her father-in-law, Dale, and it was taken in 1944 in Bakersfield, California.



7 comments:

  1. Yesterday I made a remark about people getting hit by trains. I was thinking that cars or trains really didn't go that fast back then. Sorry for that remark.
    I had forgotten about a single set of tracks with flashing lights that was about 20 miles South of my home town on US Highway #3. It was on a level, clear area, and only had a train on it once a week. But there was at least one accident that killed some one there every year. It generally was a local person that got hit. I guess people got so use to not seeing a train there they never even looked for one, and even ignored the flashing light. I use to drive on that highway maybe two or three a month and only saw the train maybe 3 times in the 20 or so years I lived there.

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  2. Tzar Nicholas might have the bootleggers sent to Siberia.... but it looks pretty snowy and cold where they were in the first place!

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  3. Awesome! Bakersfield made the cut. I wonder if the photo is truly in Bakersfield or a bit further to the northwest at Minter Field in Shafter. It was a big training center during WWII.

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  4. That's my FIl in the Army Air Corp photo. (no Air Force yet). Might have been further north, Maybelline. As Dale was from Iowa, Bakersfield was probably used to give us Midwesterners a sense of the location. Dale was never "deployed". He got his pilot training and his Wings just as World War II was ending.

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  5. Nance - For a minute there I thought your father-in-law might be my Uncle Dale. He's from Iowa, too, but he actually saw action. He wasn't a pilot. He was a tail gunner. The odds of surviving that gig were pretty slim. Impresses me that he did.

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  6. VM, I'm glad your Uncle Dale made it back home. I've read that the gunner position was a bit cramped. Is that true?

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  7. Nance - I don't remember him saying much about how cramped it was. He may have. I just remember that he said he was lucky to come back home because tail gunners had a high fatality rate. I and I thought wow, how brave he must have been.

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