Monday, August 8, 2011

Killough Brothers


Today's picture was submitted by Donna Perry. The picture was taken around 1935 in Hubbard, Texas. Donna's grandfather is in the picture, behind the man with the guitar. Her grandfather was George William Killough. Also in the picture are his brothers. I like this picture . . . guns, dogs, and guitars! This is a real classic.

As a bonus, we include the picture below, submitted by Kevin B. This picture was taken around 1900, and shows his great grandparents. The boy on the man's lap is Kevin's great grandfather. He had 6 children, but was killed when a train his his Model T, which had become stuck on the tracks.




9 comments:

  1. Photo #1: All those fellas look related.
    Photo #2: I've always been baffled by people being killed by a train.

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  2. You and me both. A train is a big and loud. you would think they could either see it or hear it, unless they were impaired by demon rum.

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  3. First photo is a little bijou. In that image i see all elements of real life of that historical period. Very interesting.

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  4. Nice pictures. Poor guy that got hit by the train. Such a big, young family, it must have been so hard for Kevin's great grandmother. I agree that getting hit by a train is more difficult these days, but I can see how it would happen back in the early 1900's. I'll bet back in the day there weren't those gates that came down, you just had to judge how far off the train was and floor it or wait. The track was probably raised a bit so you couldn't get over them easily. They probably didn't have warning lights that a train was approaching so at night it's easier to not see it? Maybe trees and brush obsured the view alot more so you might not even know it was a RR crossing. I'm guessing but I can see how that could be back in the early days of the auto. Picture No. 1 is pure Americana.

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  5. "Lots of respectable people have been hit by trains."
    Name that movie!

    Lorenzo

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  6. O Brother, Where Art Thou

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  7. Train-auto collisions were VERY common in the early part of the 20th century. Wish I could remember where I read the statistics but the numbers killed and frequency were surprising. I had a great-grandfather go that way in Iowa (drink may have contributed in many cases!).

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  8. We had a case here (near Baltimore) where a fellow STAYED IN HIS CAR when the gates came down and - of course - was smeared for miles along the track. His father tried to sue the railroad. Get out and run, you fool!

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  9. I had a great uncle who died trying to hop a train. He missed and it took his arm off. We have quite the colorful family history on both sides.

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