Friday, July 22, 2011

John C. Fremont


I consider John C. Fremont to be one of the more interesting figures in history, and one that is almost forgotten today. He was an explorer, and was responsible for mapping large portions of the western United States. He was friends with Kit Carson, and Kit served as guide on many of his expeditions. He was a teacher of Mathematics, and ran fro president in 1856 on a staunch anti-slavery platform, under the slogan, "Free Soil, Free Man, Fremont". He also served in the Mexican American war, and was a Civil War general. He also served as the governor of the Arizona Territory. As many men who were ahead of their time, Fremont died forgotten in 1890 in New York.

Have you noticed how terrible the movies are these days? It is like there are no good writers left. When I read about men like Fremont, I wonder why they do not make movies about true stories. There would be at least a dozen good movies that could be made about his life.

8 comments:

  1. Fremont was called 'The Pathfinder'. Our county is sprinkled with his name and just yesterday I was telling our grandson about him. You can still follow his footsteps to find wilderness & adventure.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I agree with your movie statement. True historical movies are generally much better than what's out today and there's no lack of material.

    In Blood and Thunder: The Epic Story of Kit Carson and the Conquest of the American West by Hampton Sides, which I just started reading, Fremont married into a family that vaulted him to his position and status...Reinforcing the truism that it's 90% who you know...

    ReplyDelete
  3. Fremont was very instrumental in mapping pre-territorial and territorial Wyoming. My husband's uncle actually found one of his plaques/markers he left in the Red Desert.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Got to agree with you on recent movies. With a few exceptions they suck. I am starting to view an Oscar as a warning label.

    Fremont was a complex man. He was big on the American stage in the mid 1800's. Bob Mayer made Fremont an important character in his latest novel "Duty, Honor, Country", which I highly recommend.
    http://www.amazon.com/Honor-Country-Novel-Point-Civil/dp/1935712365/

    ***"The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." -- Plato***

    ReplyDelete
  5. I also agree with your movie statement. I just finished reading "Taming the Nueces Strip" about Leander McNelly and McNelly's Rangers. Wow! What a story! That would keep movie-goers on the edge of their seats.

    ReplyDelete
  6. The old strip on Las Vegas, Freemont Street, is named after him.

    ReplyDelete
  7. One of the highest mountains in the Wind River Range (a view of ours out our living room window out of Pinedale Wyoming) is Fremont Peak, named for him. He is supposed to be the first white man to climb it.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Fremont is part of an army of forgotten heroes. There is no direct link or proportion between the value of people and their glory. Sir Captain Falcon Scott lived and acted in order to be remembered, and there was a bit of vanity in his undertakings, in his race to the South Pole against Amundsen. Others, like Fremont, lived as they liked, with great freedom of soul and without caring too much about posterity and the lukewarm consolation of human immortality.

    ReplyDelete