Sunday, July 10, 2011

Adam Worth



Welcome to Criminal Minds week here at OPOD, where we will examine some of history's most interesting criminals. In researching for this week, it appears that the most remembered outlaws are not necessarily the most successful ones. Books and movies are made about the criminals who ride up to a bank with guns blazing and demanding that the cash be handed over. The careers of such bandits was often times short lived.

Less known, but much more successful, were men like Adam Worth, pictured above. Adam is remembered as the "Napoleon of Crime", and people speculate that he was the inspiration for the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle figure of  "Dr. Moriarty". He used careful analysis, planning, and stealth to become of the most successful thieves in history. He got his start in the civil war as a bounty jumper. He would sign up for a regiment in the civil war under an assumed name. After receiving the signing bonus, he would defect, go somewhere else and do it again. After the civil war, he organized a band of pickpockets in New York City. One of his first big crimes was to rob the Ocean Bank. He broke into the bank at night, and cracked the safe. He then cleaned the vault out. Soon after, he robbed an express wagon of over $100,000. This would be in excess of $1,000,000 in today's dollars. He was also successful in stealing jewels, fine art, and other rarities. He died in 1902 in London.

DOMESTIC UPDATE

I am pleased to announce some degree of success with my summer project. I was able to get one of the Model T's started. Below, I am taking the lovely Miss EAM for an afternoon drive.


We made about 3 laps around the front of the house, and then disaster struck. We had a simultaneous multi-tire malfunction. The rear tire went flat, at the same time the front tire came off.


Luckily I had several extra tires for just such an occasion, and had the car up and running again in a few minutes.


With my confidence up, and a willingness to live dangerously, we then went for a spin around town.


Below is a short video, so you can hear what the car sounds like:


OK, the car is running and nominally drivable. There is still more work that needs to be done. The car seat needs to be recovered, and some hoses in the engine need to be replaced.

The biggest issue is relining the bands in the transmission. There are three transmission bands. One for forward, one for reverse, and one for braking. The reverse is very weak, and there are NO brakes at all. So, these bands need to be relined. I have the band liners, but do not have the expertise to install them. This is a tough one, as there are not many Model T mechanics around.

10 comments:

  1. If you find a good one, make sure you give him a nice Christmas gift. Then he should remember you and will be nice to you.
    Have a nice day

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  2. Hey! you got it running!!! Great video.
    Try this link for transmission help.
    http://www.modeltcentral.com
    /transmission_animation.html

    John

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  3. That is really cool! If you lived closer, I'd offer to give you a hand getting the tranmission sorted out. Congratulations on getting it running!
    Graham in St. John's

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  4. This link deals specifically with transmission bands...
    http://www.cimorelli.com/projects
    /relining_transmission_bands
    /relining_model_t_transmission
    _bands.htm

    John

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sorry about the faulty links.
    For the first one...
    just go to the homepage of modelcentral.com and click on "technical" to the left.

    The second post may show as invalid address. If so just delete the "%OA" where it shows on the url.

    John

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  6. Very cool cars you have there PJM, really like that roadster. I own a 70 AMX, so I know how hard it can be to find parts for orphaned vehicles. Good luck.

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  7. Got to love the Model-T.

    And always remember... Smiles don't have to be saved for a rainy day. It's good to waste them.

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  8. Oh yea. My dad had a 1917 T from about 1960 until his death. A ride or two every other year for me. He took it out every year AT LEAST to the Union County, Iowa Fair parade. Three brothers now, have the same era T. Good job to you! I know the old cars are a lot of work and maintenance.

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  9. Oh yea. My dad had a 1917 T from about 1960 until his death. A ride or two every other year for me. He took it out every year AT LEAST to the Union County, Iowa Fair parade. Three brothers now, have the same era T. Good job to you! I know the old cars are a lot of work and maintenance.

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  10. But how does the air conditioner work ? HAHA joking It car sounds very nice .

    -Rob

    ReplyDelete