Sunday, June 26, 2011

Roger Fenton



Good Sunday Morning to you all! This week we are going to be looking at some pioneers in the field of photography. Most of us consider Mathew Brady as the photographer to first document a way. Actually, that distinction more accurately goes to Roger Fenton, pictured above. Roger and his photographic wagons produced an extensive photographic record of the Crimean War. The Crimean War predated the Civil War by about 10 years, and was a war between France, England, Russia and the Ottoman Empire, among others.

8 comments:

  1. good morning to all

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  2. More on Roger Fenton here: http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/fenton.htm

    Some of Mr. Fenton's accomplishments:

    "...Back in England, he proposed the formation of a Photographic Society, and on 10 January 1853 this came into being, and he served as its Secretary for three years. (This is now the Royal Photographic Society).

    Fenton photographed Queen Victoria's family, and also became the official photographer to the British Museum..."

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  3. What a great theme! Now, I'm doubly looking forward to this week's photos. Thanks!

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  4. PJM, thanks for the link! What really stands out in those Crimean War photos is a feeling of incongruity . I've seen many uniforms of that era in museums. Very colorful. Lots of red and gold with polished black leather (for the British). But the photos show a stark contrast between these elaborate uniforms and the world in which they were used. They seem very much out of place wearing parade styled uniforms in such a bleak desolate setting.

    John

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  5. Wow! Great topic! I had looked into wet plate photography several years ago but decided against delving into it because of the dangerous chemicals. Learned a lot tho, and came away with a great respect for those photographic skills.

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  6. John, French soldiers were wearing lovely sky blue uniforms as late as the middle of The Great War, which made them pretty spectacular targets on a muddy battlefield. Suggestions to change to color of the uniform to olive green, brown or grey were met with scorn by the French War Office, on the basis that it would be "bad for morale". The uniforms were not changed until the US entered the war, wearing our olive greens - and surviving. It took a while to figure out that dying was also "bad for morale".

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  7. The French actually entered WW1 wearing dark blue greatcoats and red trousers. Very reminiscent of the Napoleonic uniforms of the past. Reseda green was rejected as being too similar to the German feldgrau. By 1915 horizon blue became official same year as the model 1915 adrian helmet (made of steel). The Germans did not adopt their trademark stahlhelm (steel helmet) until 1916.

    John

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  8. Hi. Just wanted to say I find your blog amusing and wonderful.

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