Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Japanese Surrender



On August 6, 1945 the US dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. Japan still did not surrender, so on August 9, 1945  second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. The Japanese did then surrender on August 15, 1945. The actual signing ceremony, pictured above, was taken on September 2, on board the USS Missouri. 

15 comments:

  1. The WWII museum in Fredericksburg, TX is a fantastic display of the Pacific Front of the war. Certainly worth a visit for people interested in WWII history. rwm

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  2. This link has a good representation of MacArthurs's words spoken that day.

    http://www.freedomdocuments.
    com/macarthur.html

    John

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  3. I would echo "anonymous" the Pacific War Museum in Fredericksburg is top drawer. The restored PT boat there is PT 309 "Oh Frankie" one of only two surviving PT boats from WWII that actually saw combat. The other one is PT 305 and is at the WWII Museum in New Orleans under restoration. I had the distinct pleasure and honor to work on both project.

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  4. Finally! The atrocities the Japanese conducted, for instance during the construction of the Birma railway, match the worst German war crimes easily.

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  5. Living the past is a dull and lonely business; looking back strains the neck muscles, causing you to bump into people not going your way.
    ~Edna Ferber

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  6. Anon (1:41) & Edna Ferber...
    Those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.

    John

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  7. When we fear things we wish for them ... every fear hides a wish.
    Fear is the enemy of logic.

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  8. Anon (2:23) Non-logic psychobabble . Going to the doctor does not equal wishing for ill health. Locking ones doors does not mean wishing for crime. Fear is a great motivator. People don't go for a colonoscopy out of respect.

    John

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  9. General Mac Arthur looks rather bored. No officer would stand at a ceremony like this one with his hands in his pocket....except Mac Arther. I understand he was self- involved and aloof.

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  10. It's only psychobabble to those who think on the surface.

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  11. Anon, I've seen the film Scanners. I still don't get what you are talking about. Please explain.

    John

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  12. If you move the camera to McArthur's back and look toward the superstructure of the USS Missouri, over the backs of the Japanese, you will see my father standing proud up high...somewhere!

    At least that is what he always said. I have looked at several pictures, including those in Fredricksburg, but the sailors up there are always so small as to be individually indistinguishable.

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  13. I've stood on that spot (there is a medallion on the deck where the surrender took place) back in the 70's when the Missouri was in Bremerton, WA. As a 15 year old I was impressed with the size of the guns.

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  14. The enemy was not so tough here!

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  15. Thumbs down- As a photographer I'm asking if there is anyway to include a photo credit?

    I think a relative of my own was on board photographing the ceremony and it would be interesting to see the names of those making the images (when possible).

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