Monday, April 25, 2011

Old Delivery Truck


Good morning to you all, and I hope each of you had a blessed Easter weekend. I had a great time, and our sunrise service was excellent. That is why I was late posting a picture yesterday . . . I got up at 4:00 AM, got over there before 5:00, and then helped with making the breakfast burritos. We had 150 people show up at 7:00 by the river for the service. That is pretty good for a community of about 300 people.

OK, not back on task . . . I love old trucks, so this week will be old truck week. We kick things off with the picture above. It was taken in 1912 in Washington DC, and it shows a delivery truck for the Woodward and Lothrop department store. I like the simple and elegant design of the truck.

12 comments:

  1. WOW!! Solid rubber tires.
    I guess you never had to worry about a flat tire.
    At least it has some leaf springs and a front bumper.

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  2. That's a cool truck!
    Graham

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  3. I like it too, but there's not much up front to protect you if you're going to have an accident. Sort of like my old VW Bus in that regard.

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  4. Those old truck were so slow that is was just a step up from horse drawn wagon. But they were a lot handier. They were easy to bacl up and you didn't have to worry about a loud noise spooking you truck

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  5. Gotta love that crank start in front. A local car mechanic was working on a vintage car. He tried starting it, the handle caught him in the head. He got his skull fractured and hasn't been quite "right" since.

    John

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  6. Yes the crank on these early engines was very dangerous. It was very to easy to have your thumb broken if you did not grasp the crank properly. This is also why electric vehicles were developed. Yes I said electric vehicles. They were looked at as a "womans car". Because it did not have a crank start. Just jump in and drive.

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  7. I love the old delivery trucks too. This one shows a lot of the design hold over from the days of wagons and teams - which were still in pretty wide use most places when this picture was taken.

    Makes sense, considering some manufacturers of early cars and trucks had their start as wagon/carriage makers.

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  8. Great pics of the workhorse of the period. I bet the driver would have appreciated an enclosed cab during the very cold winters in the Washington area.

    Woodward and Lothrup was a premium merchandice store roughly equivilent to the Nordstrom chain today. They lasted in Washington and Virginia until at least the early 70's (I left there for a short career in the Air Force), but by the mid 90's, I could not find them when I returned for a visit.

    Today, Washingtom seemingly boils with the modern equivilent of these medium size trucks. They also will double park without any remorse. Makes me glad I live in a much smaller town.

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  9. I want a truck like that to commute to work in!

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  10. Good heavens! Are the headlights aimed at the trees? Or is that just a "look out; here I come" sort of thing? I know the first cars didn't have headlights.

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  11. Nice Truck. How far the industry has come in last 50-60 years. In Next 50 year we will probably have rocket ships
    Menaka Indrani

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  12. @Al: Woodies went bankrupt in 1995 following a couple of decades of mismanagement. I worked for them for seven years in the 70s, in a variety of jobs from retail sales to management. They had a good thing and were the largest non-government employer in the DC area, with 13 branch locations, until they went for the bottom line at the expense of customer service and employee loyalty.

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