Monday, March 21, 2011

Isleta Woman


Today's picture is from 1910. It shows a woman of the Isleata Pueblo. This photograph shows a very different glimpse of this group of Native Americans. The lifestyle implied from the photograph is different from the nomadic hunter/gatherer often associated with Native Americans.

21 comments:

  1. I like her "high top" footwear

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  2. I know a lot of the clothing that indigenous peoples wear is designed for a purpose. Do you suppose the leggings were originally to protect against thorns, snakebite and other hazards of day to day life?

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  3. For Marie, yes, the leggings were originally designed to protect a woman's legs from the danger of thorns and such. Remember, before the time of colonization, there were no "antibiotics" to fight infections. Also, this photo being in 1910 is after the time when Native Americans began to trade for cloth and such, adapting their traditional attire accordingly.

    For Distilled...not Ugg boots, MOCCASINS with leggings. I know, I have my own!

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  4. I guess that by 1910 fashions were already changing to become more European. Here's a photo of an Isleta girl taken 1890: commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Charles_Lummis,_Young_Indian_girl,_pueblo_of_Isleta,_New_Mexico,_1890.jpg, note the large cross (and the smaller ones) on her necklace.

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  5. The crosses.
    I'm not sure of the history in the US but here in Canada Christianity was forced on the Native people.
    Hundreds of thousands of Native children were taken from their parents and put in what were called 'Residential Schools', which were Christian schools run by different Christian churches.

    The Native children were forced to adopt the English language, their Native traditions were outlawed and any child caught speaking their Native tongue were beaten, or worse.

    Their Native names were taken away and they were forced to take English names, often associated with the English language and Christian traditions.

    Children were often raped and even murdered.


    To this day the effects of those Residential schools and other colonization enforcements that were inflicted on the First Nations people have destroyed their lives and that of their heritage.

    D

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  6. I don't know the full extent of what was going on, but they did the something like that here in North Dakota. At Wahpeton N.D. they had a large Indian school with dorms. The kids were whipped if the spoke anything but English. I don't know if it was mandatory that all children attended or not, but there were a lot of kids there. They had kids run away from the school, so I would guess things were a little harsh.
    Check out this site
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_boarding_schools

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  7. Anonymous "D" and RTD... do you have a timeframe on when these events occurred? I found some brief mention relating to Canada but no dates. Only one such event is too much but to what extent did this happen? I'm sure nothing compared to what currently goes on in Cuba, China, Sudan, Saudi Arabia etc.

    John

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  8. Check out this site. It is a real eye opener.
    copy and paste it

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_boarding_schools

    I was in Wahpeton ND in the mid 60's and saw them then.

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  9. It seems to want to cur the end of the site off. Let try this
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_boarding_schools

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  10. Assimilation tactics (i.e. forced adoption of European-American culture, the English language, and Judeo-Christian religion) on Native Americans were thought to be "civilizing" and an improvement for "savages".

    In 2009 I was going through Osoyoos, BC. One of the guides at the Desert Centre said that most of the land must have looked this way before civilisation arrived. I responded that there was a civilisation existing there, and that it was simply a different one than what we have now. With this hidden attitude of what defines civilisation, it is hardly surprising that modernization has come to mean the same thing.

    RTD mentioned the Indian Boarding Schools (as they were known in the USA) in North Dakota, but they were in use all through the USA.

    Forcing religion isn't limited to Christians, for instance the conversion of much of Persia, previously predominantly Zoroastrian, to Islam.

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  11. here is the part that keeps getting cut off
    _schools

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  12. Look up

    Native American boarding schools

    on Wikipedia

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  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  14. Sorry, just tried to post this photo of a residential school: St. Michaels, in Alert Bay, BC. Apparently it was in use until 1974. The positives of enjoying the company of other children or even the joy of learning seem monstrously dwarfed in comparison to the misery, isolation, and lasting negative effects on Native American individuals and communities.

    Here is the photo.

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  15. Thanks Astrocrabpuff for idiotproofing RTD's link. (I've had the same trouble with url clipping.)

    The linked photo reminded me that football great Jim Thorpe attended Carlisle. Although corporal punishment is mentioned (which was common in many school systems of the time) nothing as horrible as previously mentioned. Could these events have been limited to a much earlier timeframe?

    John

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  16. You guys are trippin' they're totally Ugg boots. She got them at ASDA.

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  17. John asked: “do you have a timeframe on when these events occurred?”

    The first residential school started in the 1840’s and the last one closed in 1994.
    At their peak there were about 130 schools in every territory in Canada but Newfoundland. You may be asking why not Newfoundland? Well when Nfld was settled in the late 1600’s the Native people there were called Beothuk. When European invaders arrived the Beothuk tribe were labelled ‘red Indians’ because of the red ochre colour they wore on their faces.
    The Natives were caught and sent into slavery, with many sent to England. Others were hunted down and at one point there was a bounty on their heads. The last Beothuk died in 1829. The tribe was murdered to extinction.

    Back to the Residential schools, the atrocities that happened to the Native children were for the most part hidden for over a hundred years. No REAL records were kept by the Christian churches. Well none that are believable. Many children who just disappeared were written up as having ‘ran away’, but recently burial areas of children have been found near some of these schools and it seems that some who ‘ran away’, actually were ‘hidden away’.
    So as to John’s question regarding ‘when’, the answer would be over a hundred years, but we really only know about approx 50.

    Residential school survivor groups have thousands of members and these are just those who have come forward, while many others have passed away long ago and recently, and equally many others do not want to talk about what happened to them because of the pain of remembering.

    These innocent children who were forced into Christianity and forced into European traditions have been scarred for life in many ways. One lady I knew, she went through the school system in the early 1950’s and she was raped repeatedly (having a baby due to a priest and that baby was given away). These atrocities that happened to these children and not just rape, but beatings, and humiliation and loss of their families and family love and loss of their heritage affected their whole lives, as well as the lives of their children. The destruction forced on them became……………. generational.

    “I put no stock in religion. By the word religion I have seen the lunacy of fanatics of every denomination be called the will of god. I have seen too much religion in the eyes of too many murderers. Holiness is in right action, and courage on behalf of those who cannot defend themselves, and goodness. What god desires is here, in your head and your heart and what you decide to do every day, you will be a good man - or not.”
    Kingdom of Heaven

    D

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  18. Hey John,

    I'd suspect that the abuses, rather than systematic, were specific i.e. certain individuals and certain schools. The corporal punishment was the norm not only in these schools but all schools not so long ago although I suspect that "spare the rod, spoil the child" was in full effect in trying to "correct" the "savages" AND in those corrupt officials trying to dominate the children. What I am saying is that it wasn't the schools' policies to rape children or emotionally scar children even if corporal punishment for what were deemed offences were allowed (although the severity of the punishment may not have been "capped" or monitored and merely assumed) BUT that these did occur especially because those in charge of the children knew that the children had no one to whom to turn to for help. What was systematic for all the different school was the agenda: conversion to Judeo-Christian religion; the sole use of the English language; and European-American culture (like wearing Distilled's Ugg boots).

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