Monday, March 14, 2011

Indian Brave


Good Monday Morning to you all. This morning we feature a portrait of Amos Two Bulls, a Sioux Brave. The picture was taken in 1900. By this time, the traditional Indian lifestyle had pretty much come to an end. Most were living on reservations at this point. Amos Two Bulls was a member of the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show.

12 comments:

  1. What a wonderful picture,I am part Cherokee and so am always thrilled when I see old Native American photos, thanks for sharing!

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  2. Another one that I didn't know, even though he was a Dakota Sioux. But I guess he came along after most of the action was over. Even though I though I knew a lot about the Indians up here in my neck of the, thanks to PJM I learned a lot more.

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  3. My prior comment was suppose to say "My neck of the WOODS"
    I guess that is what happens when your mind works faster than your fingers.

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  4. He looks so sad, as if he is remembering what used to be, and will never be again.

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  5. Though over a century old, this photo looks as if it were taken on a movie set today.

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  6. What a handsome man - great photograph.

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  7. Maybe I'm seeing things but the color in this photo looks odd (hold on Deacon, hear me out). Most of the picture appears as standard black and white (take it easy...) but the skin tone coloring is more like sepia tone. Anyone else see it?

    John

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  8. Certainly sepia.
    Beautiful photo.

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  9. Beautiful pic. He looks melancholic... And how worthy he looks!

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  10. In regards to being PC, what you had said yesterday ("So, in looking at the picture we must wonder whether this is the way he looked as a traditional Indian person, or whether this is how Buffalo Bill told him he should dress for the show.") is actually pretty analytical (and politically correct!)!

    At least in my opinion, you clearly put thought into how white influence effects the majority's idea of a Native American. I think that by mentioning the hegemonic forces that shape our 'ideal' native you are actually making a very considerate evaluation of what is truly Native American and who gets to decide that.

    Anyways. Maybe that's a trivial side note. But as a current anthropology student at a VERY liberal college, I'd say you're conclusions include analytical aspects of Native American identity.

    This is all my opinion, though.

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  11. What strikes me about photographs of Native Americans from this time is the inherent dignity of the subjects.

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  12. He is beautiful.

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