Wednesday, March 30, 2011

General Store



Good Wednesday Morning to you all. Today, we feature a picture of the General Store in Christoval, Texas in 1900. To me the picture looks like something straight out of the Old West. If you zoom in on the picture, the little structure on the right is labeled "Filling Station." Not sure what was dispensed there.

Also, I have gotten lots of email this week from people who lived in Christoval at some time, and some even from people who lived here "back in the day". I got an email from Vivian who lived in these parts in the 40's and she told me that the man seated in the Blacksmith Shop picture on Monday was W. T. Mckee.

15 comments:

  1. Is this too early to think that the filling station was for fuel of some sort. What else would need to be dispensed outside rather than inside the store? I also noticed that it appears there is no door in the doorway and then I saw the screen door laying against the porch columns. Also...I see the bars on the windows. High crime at this time?

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  2. Oh...and the presence of the 55 gallon drum also makes one think it was fuel of some kind. Kerosene? For lamps?

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  3. Sorry for three posts...keep noticing things. There is a pipe coming from the ground to the left of the filling station with a spicket and valve on the top. Running water in 1900?

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  4. Great picture. The boy behind the 'filling station' is quite bored with the whole thing. Other possibilities for the 'filling station' are water or air for bike tires?

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  5. Probably Coal Oil or Kerosene at the filling station. Oddly enough, in early times people would take coal oil internally (with the taste masked by sugar) as a "cure" for many ailments - mostly coughs and respiratory complaints.

    No thanks!

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  6. The round metal sign above the filling station looks as if it might be for a public phone. One phone per town, and they all survived! Today's kids would have a fit!

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  7. I must say that it warms my heart to see this photo.
    Nowaday's everybody in the service industry is into themselves. In my day you could go down to the filling station and get your fill of gasoline and the attendant would check your oil and wash your windshield for no cost too!
    NOw when I go to a service station if I ask for an oil change the attendant acts as if I'm asking for the money in his wallet!
    In my time people cared about each other, not like the selfish twirps in the mini marts now.
    I went to the store the other day to get a pack of smokes and the young punk at the counter was talking on his cell phone acting as if I wasn't there. In my day we had young clerks working at stores too, but they had respect for their elders and if they didn't do their job they were out the door. I suppose if i yelled at the kid he would have sued me for emotional harrassment. Darn!!!!
    Keep the old pics coming. I prefer to remember my country in its better days!!

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  8. I enjoy the pictures and reading the comments but, who will explain why the town was not named 'Mentown'.

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  9. Makes one wonder what the special occasion for the photo was. They all seem to be dressed in their best, and standing tall.

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  10. Lady Ann,
    I believe this was well before telephones. I had thought the same as you, but enlarged the original and the center of the sign says "supplies". I could not make out supplies of what.

    Ellena,
    Look at Sunday's picture . . . two women buckaroos riding side saddle and packing heat.

    PJM

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  11. It appears the kid behind the filling station is talking on his cell phone.

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  12. It appears the kid behind the filling station is talking on his cell phone.

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  13. How wonderful to have such a wealth of history about where you live!!

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  14. Currently, I am working out of Pearsall, Tx. All around me are towns that are still so much like they have been for many decades. Every chance I get I drive many miles just to enjoy the small towns and the slow pace. However, some of them are very busy and a lot of traffic for the size of the town. It is still better than driving in Houston!

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  15. There are some letters on the side wall of the filling station. I can make out the first two as G and A. Gasoline maybe?

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