Monday, March 28, 2011

Blackmsith



As I mentioned yesterday, this will be Christoval, Texas week. Today's picture was taken around 1900, and it shows the town blacksmith shop. The man is shown shoeing a horse. Maybe someone who knows something about horses could tell us a little more about what is going on. What is the think in front of the horse that looks a little like a car jack?

11 comments:

  1. I earned a living shoeing horses for several years when I was in college. The object in front of the horse is a hoof stand. When you are rasping the outer rim of the hoof you pull the horse's leg forward.

    You need both hands to use a rasp, so you need a way to hold the hoof up off the ground. You can either use your knee, or a hoof stand. I've used both, and the hoof stand is way easier on your knees.

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  2. I was just going to say that this IS a car jack.
    Thanks Paladin.
    I also want to say "can't wait till tomorrow" to PJM but at my age it's better to remain unsaid.

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  3. So it's a horse jack! Interesting. I was putting in some evergreen bushes at my moms house in Stoughton Ma. and uncovered some horse shoes about 6 to 8 inches deep. Got me thinking of what the area must have looked like years back, lots of New England rock walls in the area so it had to be a farm. Then again the main street in front has been there since the 1700's so maybe they were from years of horse's throwing a shoe, like a car losing it's hub cap?

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  4. Paladin is correct.
    My father was a farrier and you have to have a good back for that job! Sadly as a kid I was more interested in other things and I never learned the secrets of the trade. But horses have always be a part of my life as they are now.
    Just a bit of trivia, but there are more horses in the world today than ever in the past.
    Horses are the unsung heroes of the world. They gave us travel, laboured for us and took us into battle. Without them, it makes one wonder where we would be now.

    The best thing for the inside of a human being is the outside of a horse.
    D

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  5. When I was about nine years old my Dad took me along to Clearmont, IA when he was having his horse shod. It was an old old blacksmith shop that still had the original bellows in the middle and rings to tie the horse to along the outer walls. The smithy was not a young man and hot shod all his horses. It was like stepping back 80 years and a very neat day. I've never forgotten it.

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  6. In front of the horse looks a little like a jerk.

    Why is someone always sitting around while work is being done?

    Maybe he's a boss.

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  7. Joe,
    My guess is, and it is only a guess, the blacksmith is shoing the horse, and the owner is waiting. Sort of like us at ziplube waiting for oil change.
    PJM

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  8. Anonymous is right about the horse. I have often wondered what the Americas would have been like if horses had not died out before our ancesters reached these shores. The only beasts of burden were mainly women and dogs with a few exceptions (lamas and reindeer) that were limited. The horse gave the Europeans and Asians ability to move great distances to see and do new ways and different ideas.

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  9. Anyone have a guess what the AOE carved on the door might mean? Or is it MOE ?

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  10. Why is someone always sitting around while work is being done?

    My guess is you don't bother a tradesman when he is doing his job. Nothing is more irritating than a customer breathing down your neck when you're trying to work. The 'ziplube' example works for me.

    AOE or MOE? I took the photo and enlarged it and changed the contrast. It certainly seems like AOE.

    D

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  11. I think I'll drive to Christoval one day and see how it looks today. This photo is wonderful. Thank you for sharing it with us.

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