Monday, February 28, 2011

William Clarke Quantrill


Good Monday Morning to you all. This morning we feature a photograph of William Clarke Quantrill of the famed Quantrill Raiders of the Civil War. He is remembered for his escapades along the Missouri-Kansas border during the Civil War, and more specifically the raid on Lawrence, Kansas. He was one of effective of the Raiders of that day, and was a particular thorn in the side of the Union. He was killed in a Union ambush in Kentucky, 1865. Brilliant horse soldier, or blood thirsty bandit? . . . the debate continues to this day.

14 comments:

  1. My vote is "A brilliant Blood thirsty bandit". He did a lot id planning for his raids. Right down to how they would disperse after a raid and meet up again.

    The Confederate leadership was appalled by the raid on Lawrence, Kansas, and withdrew even tacit support from the "bushwackers".

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  2. He was a terrorist, pure and simple. The raid on Lawrence was a disgusting display of just how low humans can reach.

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  3. thats as may be... but he does have one hell of a moustache.

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  4. BS . . . as opposed to Sherman's raping and pillaging march to the sea?

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  5. I agree with BS. Nothing brave or honorable about executing noncombatant civilians. I think there's a distinction to be made here regarding the "raping an pillaging" comment. Undisciplined troops are a disgrace to the uniform. If such acts are committed as part of the standing orders or with the quiet approval of the officers it's much worse. I venture to say North and South had there share of criminal acts committed by soldiers. If they were caught and punished then justice is served. However, if it was encouraged or part of a tactical plan.... then hanging is too good for all involved. Especially the commanding officer.

    John

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  6. He has managed quite a smile for a photograph of that era (most subjects look forlorn or pensive). I come away with the impression that he was a contented man.

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  7. Interesting to read the comments made for and against Quantrill. History definitely has a footnote reserved for this personage and the men he led. My thought would be taking into account what we know,what might have happened in line with the tip of the iceberg theory? What hideous acts committed that will forever remain unknown because no one back then had a camcorder? I often think of what part of human history will never truly be known but for the simple fact that it was not recorded? Just a thought?

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  8. PJM, are you near any of the grass fires?

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  9. It is interesting to read the comments. Guess I need to read some of my books on the civil war starting with the raid on Lawrence Kansas.

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  10. The Civil War certainly was one of the most bloodthursty, hateful amd immoral wars for America. It was relatively mild in terms of the wars that followed, except for the fact that it was American against American.

    Sherman and Qauantrill were the noted dealers of death, but a vast number of accounts show similar or worse atrosoties at all levels of the ranks; they just weren't well documented or passed through to the press.

    I sincerely hope we will never get into that situation again.

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  11. Quantrill was certainly NOT a gentleman, raider or otherwise. In our family, Quantrill's raiders in Missouri murdered a 14 year old boy when he tried to save the family's milk cow for a baby in the family. Shot him in cold blood on the porch in front of his mother. They were cruel bandits and murderers.

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  12. -Autobiography of Lydia Meader Chace (now Chase)

    We were nearly three weeks on the road but did not think very much of the unsettled condition (the Civil War) until we reached the Kansas line. Then we began to realize that we were traveling where the effects of the conflict were being felt, more especially the recent struggle to make Kansas a free state. There had been many raids, some called Bushwhackers coming from Missouri to Kansas, and some called Red Legs coming from Kansas to Missouri. ...
    It was a great trial to us to be so near the border where there was continual plundering and robbing, ...
    The seventh night after reaching the Mission, Bushwhackers passed within a mile of us, as we were living near Graham Rogers, the Shawnee chief. They raided the little town of Shawnee 2 1/2 miles from us, killed a few men, and burned several houses. Most of the men did not dare sleep in their houses. That first summer was one of much anxiety, as soldiers were passing daily. Every few days men were called to their doors and shot. We were preserved from harm, although we were sure that men lay around our house watching and some years after when we were in the south, a man called Amasa by name and told him that he had lain around our house many a night and described the house accurately.
    ...
    In October 1864 came what is known as the Price raid. The militia took all the provisions, cattle, and horses that they wanted; they took one of our teams and Amasa went with them, as he was sure that otherwise they would not return them. As soon as he could, he got a permit to come home and when he got back, a battle was impending and all the militia were ordered to the bottoms near Wyandotte (now Kansas City, Kansas). A very sick woman whose husband was with the militia sent for me and that left our children alone with Uncle Burgess. There was a skirmish the 7th day of October and hundreds of militia left the ranks so frightened that they did not know in what direction to go to get to Shawnee. Our son Henry (12) went with some of them to show them the way. The militia reported that General Price was coming and we must go on into Kansas, but the woman I was with was too sick to move even if we had been certain that Price was coming. After reading the 91st Psalm and a season of prayer, the sick woman got easier and we retired to rest and sleep. At 4 a.m. I was aroused by the sound of cannon and it was soon reported that there was a battle in progress near Westport. We could hear the report of cannons until nearly 11:00 a.m. when the awful noise ceased and we learned that the Confederates had retreated south down the Missouri line. Amasa followed with supplies for the wounded soldiers, going 30 miles, then returned the third day to Kansas City, the first I had known of him since he left home before the battles. There were over 1100 killed or wounded in the battle. It was not the militia which kept Price from coming to Kansas, but General Curtis with 80,000 men coming up behind him. The next day was a very solemn day, as we did not know who of our neighbors might not return. Later we learned that only one had been killed.

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  13. I love his smile and epic 'stache

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  14. William Quantrill was a soldier doing a soldier's job during a time of war. Sherman committed the exact same atrocities on his march through Atlanta onto savannah. Quantrill was labeled a villain but Sherman was called a hero for using the same guerilla tactics as Quantrill. I wonder, if the south had won the civil war, would Quantrill be the hero and Sherman the villain?

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