Thursday, February 10, 2011

Loading Riverboats



Today's picture shows a Riverboat being loaded in Vicksburg, Mississippi. I do believe I see a few bales of cotton being readied for loading. Now, as a professional courtesy, I tend to shy away from criticizing the riverboat captaintry of others, but I do feel like the captain of the middle riverboat brought her in a wee bit close to the riverboat on the right. If I were the riverboat captain, I would always try and leave at least three feet between me and the next riverboat when parking. I have always felt that such a courtesy tends to help avoid conflict and harsh words between the crews of the two vessels.

14 comments:

  1. This just looks like an other angle of your photo from Monday, I remember thinking back then about how the captain had his boat right up against the one in front of him. At the time I also thought, WOW, he is right up against the rails of the other boat.

    ReplyDelete
  2. That sure is a busy loading area. At least four steam boats in there at the same time. But like you said, I think I would be a litle put off if some one park their boat that close to mine.
    Maybe the current pulled some on the anchor rope and it just drifted in that close.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Earlier this week some one remarked that two pictures seemed to be of the same ship. All of the boats in this shot look to be identical.

    Here's a question. My dad (a Navy man) said a ship is large enough to hold a boat. (Man the life boats!) Why are these vessels called boats, instead of ships? Inquiring minds, and all that.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'll add to the ship vs boat question. Submarines, no matter how large, are referred to as boats.

    John

    ReplyDelete
  6. As to space between boats, remember that rivers have current. It very well may have been necessary to brace the boats against each other and even tie them together to hold them steady for loading. I grew up in, on, and around the Tippecanoe River in Indiana, and learned by experience the force (and danger) of river currents.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Here's an explanation of the difference between boat and ship: http://tinyurl.com/kscaml

    ReplyDelete
  8. Try this site

    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-difference-between-a-ship-and-a-boat.htm

    ReplyDelete
  9. Having the riverboats in contact with one another is not even a concern as boats touch against docks all the time. A boat is not like a car.

    Also, it is worth noting that there is no moorage so the riverboats cannot tie-up to a spaced "spot" and unless it's a tidal river, there is no tide which would cause the riverboats to bump forcefully against one another.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Sorry, but I'm only concerned about the cars that come to close to mine.
    I know-wrong subject.

    ReplyDelete
  11. If you look really close between the two riverboats you will see posts which disappear into the water. They are white, rectangular in crossection and extend up to the second deck of the boats. There's one where the boats seem to contact and two more along the side of the boat on the right. Maybe these are mooring points. If so it's not such a haphazard arrangement after all.

    John

    ReplyDelete
  12. The landing at Vicksburg, as well as other river towns, was a public landing. No assigned spaces, tie up where there's room.

    Boats would always put the bow in facing the current. This would allow the river to help them when backing into the channel. Packets would use wood or rope as bumpers to lessen contact while moored.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I believe it to perhaps be the result of a situation known to RBC, (River Boat Captains)
    as..aquatic drift...or not.

    brokedown

    ReplyDelete
  14. The photo looks very good and I think a SLR camera has been used to photograph it. I like your images very much. I am a little photographer myself

    ReplyDelete