Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Loading Cotton



Finally, the picture I have been looking for . . . a scene showing cotton being unloaded from a Mississippi Riverboat. The picture was taken at a landing near Memphis, Tennessee. I am concluding that one of the most interesting things that you could have done in history was being a Riverboat Captain on the Mississippi River. If you look at the picture above, the cotton and other cargo is on the lower level. What is on the second and third decks? Are those passenger cabins?

13 comments:

  1. Anon from yesterday is right. These are the same riverboats. Or were they all so similar you couldn't tell them apart? Nevertheless, they are massive, majestic & interesting. Thanks PJM. How are you feeling mid-week?

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  2. I think its quite interesting how low the boat is in the water.

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  3. The cabins above the deck look pretty basic so I doubt this one could be termed a showboat. Tramp steamer maybe?

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  4. Do you have a date for the photo?
    Kinda strange how close the electric wires are to the shore.

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  5. They are actually *unloading* cotton. Ive seen this photo before.

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  6. To Maybelline: Those aren't electric wires, they are old open wire telephone circuits. Don't see open wire much any more, it was all replaced over the years by those black cables you see hanging on the poles now. The electric will be on the top of the pole, and the telephone and cable TV about half way down.

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  7. Not about riverboats, but your home agriculture:

    Check out spray-n-grow.com

    It's a Texas business with unique products that really do optimize your garden.

    One day you'll thank me!

    Please, where's the home update?

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  8. Not about riverboats, but your home agriculture:

    Check out spray-n-grow.com

    It's a Texas business with unique products that really do optimize your garden.

    One day you'll thank me!

    Please, where's the home update?

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  9. (The) Degas had relatives in the U.S. cotton business, and went to visit them: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Edgar_Germain_Hilaire_Degas_016.jpg

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  10. trying that link again:
    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/
    File:Edgar_Germain_Hilaire_Degas_016.jpg (if the link isn't complete, go to Google images and input "degas cotton exchange")

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  11. The lowest deck was the main deck. Next was the boiler deck, above that was the hurricane, then the Texas, and on top the pilot house. Second and lower class passengers slept on the main deck where ever there was space. First class had cabins on the boiler deck. Officers were on the Texas.

    This is a different boat than the previous two. Very plain and unadorned working packet. City of...?.

    A tramp steamer was any boat working outside of it's normal trade route. A boat's owner would do this during slow times at home.

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  12. Sorry for breaking up the continuity of the thread, but I just wanted to say that I think you have a wonderful blog! Very impressive collection of photographs.

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  13. Have to change my mind set. This midwestern gal always envisioned cotton bales like a 1960s hay bale. Smaller. Well, I learn something every day. Thanks for some good photos!

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