Monday, January 10, 2011

Service Station



Today's picture is from 1925, and shows an old Texaco service station. If you click on the photograph, you can see an enlarged version, where you can see lots of detail. I like how the owner of the station has his name on the sign above the building. The pumps are the old type which had large glass jars on top. The attendant had a hand pump which he would use to pump gas up into the glass jar, to the desired amount. Then the gas would gravity flow into the car's gas tank. This was a pretty ingenious system, and it let the customer actually see the quantity and quality of gasoline he was purchasing. These types of pumps were pretty much gone by the time I came along.

11 comments:

  1. enazeduGood morning PJM.
    That is one neat and clean gas station. Everything is painted and in it's place, nice lawn area.
    I see it called a service station, but I don't see any service bays with it. Maybe they are in a seperate building.

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  2. sorry for the "enazedu". at the start of my comment.
    That was the word verification that didn't seem to take in the box

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  3. I would purchase a bunch of those lots for $2 down and $2 per month. Oh wait, I would only be earning about $200 per year so I guess things never change. Where is/was Fanny Mae when you need them.

    Very good picture. This was a real high volume station with four "pumps".

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  4. I love that picture. So quaint and neat. I often wonder why they took those pictures back then, and who took them. Very good quality.

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  5. I like the idea of 24 and 20 cent a gallon gas, although that's a quite a difference percentage-wise, just to get high test

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  6. I wish stations had this kind of character now, too bad they are all practically copies of each other, and bland ones at that.

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  7. I love how each one has its own persoanlity. Just like each down and street do. All this everything must look and be the same. I love seeing the personalities that are coming out not just in the station but as well as the street and location of the pciture. Thank you for sharing. Love these photos.

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  8. Sometimes I like to match up the locations of the photos in OPOD with the current day locations and see how they are different. This was a tough one but there were enough clues in the pic to come very close. In the pic to the right there is a sign for new lots at Carmody Hills. I found a Carmody Hills neighborhood in Capitol Heights MD. The other sign above the Carmody Hills sign says East Capitol. There is a East Capitol St. NE. in Capitol Heights MD. The final clue is that this service Station is called Benning. In Capitol Heights MD there is a Benning street so I figure this station must be right around the intersection of Benning and East Capitol Sts. in Capitol Heights MD. I may be wrong but too many place names match up here. If you do a google maps street view you can see what the general area looks like now and yes it's the same as anywhere else these days.

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  9. Al, $2 down, $2 a month, AND no interest.

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  10. This station was right on the border of Washington DC and Maryland. East Capitol Street runs from the U.S. Capitol to the Maryland line, then merges with and becomes Central Avenue. Carmody Hills is an unincorporated area just outside of DC. The entire area has been a crime-ridden mess for decades.

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  11. I love it when my favorite blogs (including yours) inspire me for my own blog on Milan, Italy. Here's a tribute to your blog and to the theme of old gas stations on my blog "My Milan (Italy)": http://mymilanitaly.blogspot.com/2011/01/interesting-gas-stations.html
    There's the first of at least two interesting gas stations in Milan.
    Thanks for the inspiration and for your fun blog.

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