Thursday, January 13, 2011

Gas Station Body Work


Today's picture is from the 1920's and shows the garage attached to a gas station. You can see the station offered not only gasoline, but body work and auto painting as well. I can remember Mr. Gay's filling station, which we frequented in the 1960's offered body work, and auto painting. He did each job with great pride. 

I enjoyed all the lively discussion on yesterday's picture. Apparently a lot of you remember the Jimmy Carter gas lines. I got a nasty comment from what appeared to be a Jimmy Carter fan. I deleted it. I don't mind snide comments from long time visitors/contributors, but don't like drive by shooters. If you are going to leave snide comments, you need to first become part of the community here. Just the way we are going to do things here.


17 comments:

  1. In regard to the gas lines discussed yesterday, I guess Jimmy Carter had a major impact on my life, in particular my choice of career. Because of the gas shortage, I realized that there were going to be employment opportunities in the petroleum industry. With that in mind, I became a petroleum geologist instead of an electrical engineer, which was my plan all through high school. Funny how things work out.

    Graham in St. John's

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  2. Good Morning PJM.
    I am doing some traveling right now and will comment later or tomorrow

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  3. Hello--I became a recent follower of your blog,and I just want to say I very much enjoy it. I am too young to remember almost all of these things, but I have an old soul and am oddly nostalgic for times I never even knew. Keep up the good work :)

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  4. Carter was a naive President if only for the fact that he was too honest. He would never cut any type of deals with congress--including his own party, which infuriated them and made him many enemies. This is one of the reasons the liberal wing of the party pushed Ted Kennedy to run against Carter in 1980.
    The entire decade of the 1970's had a lousy economy. For the record, we also had gas lines under Richard M. Nixon in 1974, and that was in the Winter and he was a Republican who had a much more enlightened and intelligent world view than Carter.
    In short, Carter didn't create the lousy economy of his time; he followed the footsteps of Nixon and Ford. He did leave office with a deficit of 60 billion dollars that ten years later was quadrupled under Republican administrations [with budgets these GOP presidents signed with thier own pen in hand].

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  5. Your vintage photos are wonderful and the stories you write about them with the great history. This is why I recently became a follower. I love history the good the bad and the ugly of it. There is always some not so high points in every ere. And how it influnces us or doesnt. Thank you for making a stand.
    Todays photo is a nice reminder of the days gone by when you had full service stations and the customer could rely on getting everything done in one location. Today I have to go to several places to get my car serviced.

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  6. Labor was different in the 20's. They are painting cars in the picture correct? No masks, no ventalation? How did they do this without passing out? Can you imagine how toxic the paint fumes are? I don't know much about paint but I'm sure this can't be very good for you. In regards, to the gas lines of the 70's I was 15'ish and can remember complaining to my Dad that it figures, just when I'm close to getting my drivers license, the world is going to run out of oil. My Dad laughed and laughed, poor little brainwashed son. LOL.

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  7. I'm curious why the oil shortage was Carter's fault. Wasn't it a combination of OPEC flexing their new muscles, and Big Oil realizing how much they could make from a shortage?

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  8. Now it's all specialists in different locations who take care of different vehicle issues (transmission, brakes, bodywork, etc) instead of having a mechanic who "does it all".

    Me, I'd be glad if the auto-glass shop that worked on my car a few days ago returned the snow-brush they took from my car, which they removed when vacuuming the glass shards out. :P

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  9. I spent about forty-years in body shops. I'm still breathing but my hearing is shot. I still hear with hearing aids but I read closed caption on t.v. That really takes the fun out of watching county music shows. Yes, I wish I had used more hearing protection.
    But,I did enjoy taking wreck and making it pretty again.

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  10. Ah.. the gas lines. I needed fuel to run the trucks my business used. All of us small business owners had to find gas station owners who could help us to that end. Fortunately I had always used two local stations regularly and with their help I was able to survive those times.
    The Carter years also meant very high interest rates. My younger brother's first mortgage during this period was 16.5%.
    I can agree that President Carter was perhaps too honest but he was totally inexperienced and inept for the Presidency.
    Just my opinion of course, but I find it hard to hold back a laugh when I see him giving advice to other Presidents.

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  11. I love your pictures - but what I'm loving today are all these comments. What a great community you have brought together.

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  12. I love this site !

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  13. Henry Ford had a quote that went something like, "you can have whatever color you want, as long as it's black". Seems the color black dried faster.

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  14. I love Squeaky's comment so full of legitimate pride in work well done. It's heartwarming and makes me sad at the same time because it seems like a thing of the past, or is it too easy to notice what goes wrong, rather than what goes right? I wonder. Thanks to the regular visitors for their interesting comments and to the blog owner for the great blog.

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  15. I'm still amazed at the look of older cars. It looks so odd.

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  16. Not a lot changed between then and the '70s. My dad did body work. The above scene with the exception of clothing and cars looks pretty familiar to me. The austerity of the place. Cement floors splashed with stains. Air pressure paint hoses. Now everything's fiberglass, so no knocking out dents with precision. My dad retired just in time I think.

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  17. Old Farm Equipment would be a great thing for Rog - I would ask Rog what kind of tires these are - they give you quite a bumpy ride - That's my neighbor George on my BACKHOE

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