Friday, January 28, 2011

Belle Glade, Florida


To me, this is the saddest picture we have seen all week. The picture was taken in Belle Glade, Florida. It shows two of the eleven children of a migrant family. The older boy is caring for the younger one, who has been sick and lost lots of weight. The family is stuck in Belle Glade, because the parents lost the car. I really wish that I could hear the story of how their lives played out . . . were they able to overcome this poverty and lead happy lives?

10 comments:

  1. That child is so much older than his years, you can see it in his eyes.

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  2. To NANCE from yesterday.
    I know of a woman that is 40 years old that lost her kids to her ex-husband and is suppose to pay him child support now. Neither her or her boyfriend work. One reason is, she would have to pay child support. She just begs money from friends and relatives and lives off welfare. They try to tell people that she is trying to find work, but nobody is hiring. There is always work out there like McDonalds or if you are willing to wash dishes or clean floors. But I suppose word gets around about your missing work or not willing to work hard.
    But one thing is they seem top find money for cigarette and beer.

    But like I said, more power to the ones that DO find a way to make it work out.

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  3. i can see aso that the 2 kids are white skin and blond hair, it shows that the GD chose no "ethinic group", it hitted all the u.s.
    by the way, forgive me if made some spelling/digitation mistake, too long i dont use my english.

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  4. This picture reminds me of two books I just read, by Jeanette Walls--the first was The Glass Castle and the second, Half-Broke Horses. They are the story of her family, growing up in the early 1900s, and through the Depression, and, in The Glass Castle, up to modern day. What really struck me was how, in the midst of the abject poverty they found themselves in, she and her grandmother both found ways to climb out of that and make better lives for themselves. Her parents, unfortunately, ultimately CHOSE homelessness. Some of the children fared better than others; it was a reminder to me that so much of our lives really do depend on what we decide to make of them, regardless of current circumstance. I highly recommend both books!

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  5. I found all week's photos to be pretty depressing, and especially today's. My parents grew up in rural Iowa and my Dad told me during the depression they really never wanted for food, growing more than they needed, and bartered for other things. Cash for taxes on the farm every year though, was especially hard to come up with. They always managed to squeak through every year.

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  6. Putting a human face on hard times always drives the issue to the heart. I have some relatives who has lost everything during the depression and the dust bowl. Their stories were always sobering.

    Good week of photos PJM

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  7. About 10 years ago I learned that one of my dad's brothers and his family were in this situation in Oklahoma during the Depression. They had moved away from the rest of the family because of a job in the oil fields, which he was then cheated out of. There was a rule that relatives couldn't work for the company. His brother-in-law turned him in and he was let go. They had no home, no car and no money. The only thing they could do was walk out of town and pitch a tent in the woods and eat pancakes made from flour and water until they found an empty house. It hurt me a lot to learn of all this, and I don't think my dad ever knew. My uncle wasn't even bitter toward the brother-in-law, who later became quite wealthy.

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  8. This is a sad picture. It also crosses mind how their lives played out. Sometimes we think we have it tough, but the pictures of this week have definitely hit home to me that my life is really very good. Thanks for revisiting the Great Depression era. I think I needed it.

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  9. A very sad note to not such a happy week..visiting the Great Depression through photos is about as close as I want to get:)

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  10. Do you know more about the photo? For example do you know who took the picture? I am doing an AP history project on the Great Depression and I find this particular photo very intriguing. Thanks! :D

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