Friday, December 31, 2010

Roundup Week Wrapup



Since tomorrow is Mystery Person Contest day, we wrap up Roundup Week with this photograph. This is another picture from 1939 at the Quarter Circle U ranch in Montana. If you look at the Cowboy's shirt pocket, you see a little round tab hanging out. This would be the tab on a pouch of Bull Durham tobacco. This was a little bag of cigarette tobacco, that had rolling papers attached. When I was growing up, just about all the cowboys, ranchers and farmers smoked Bull Durham. Store rolled cigarettes were a lot more expensive, so the guys would roll their own.

What is he eating you ask? Well, he is eating a Rocky Mountain Oyster. Don't know what a Rocky Mountain Oyster is?  . . . google it.

OK, I normally show photographs here, and not old lithographs, but when looking through photographs to use this week, I found this old lithograph of a cowboy. I really liked it, so wanted to share it with you today.


Just a reminder, tomorrow is Mystery Person Contest day. If you are a new visitor, this is how it works. I put up a picture of someone with no other information. Whoever figures out who it is first, wins. If no one figures out who it is in 24 hours, then I win. If I win, then I make a big victory breakfast, and flaunt it to the world. My Arch-Nemesis, the Evil Nate Maas usually plays, and has had some small degree of success in the past, but tomorrow will be the day I defeat him. Oh yes, tomorrow he will be defeated.

20 comments:

  1. My family were all "Target' smokers. My fil a Bugler man.
    Lorenzo Poe

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  2. I see that your lithograph is a advertisement for WIEDEMANN BEER. Never heard of them, but then there a lot of beers nobody has heard of.

    Looks like your cowboy in the photos is in charge of keeping the branding iron hot. That is an awful small fire, but I see he has a shovel handy in cas it gets away from him.
    They generally have 2 or 3 irons in the fire as to keep them hot between calves, and that one looks plenty hot right now.

    Pretty sparse looks grass at that site. I think the rule was only one cow per 10 acre. So if you had 1000 acre area you would only run 100 cattle on it.

    When I lived in Montana I use to help with some brandings just to get a small cooler of Rocky Mountains Oyster. YUMMY are they good.

    Well that is it, being the office is closed today, I am officially retired. Hot Dang. Tried to sleep in, but did make it past my 4:00 a.m. wake up time all the way till 5:00

    HAPPY NEW YEAR to Mr. PJM, Mrs PJM and. Ms PJM and, all those in chickie town including your boss that sneaking Handsome Jack .

    And a great big HAPPY NEW YEAR to all you loyal readers

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  3. Roger,
    Congratulations from the PJM global headquarters on reaching your retirement. Hope it is long, productive, and worth the wait.

    Retiring from the Trailer Park, does not mean, however, retiring from your duties as posting the first comment on OPOD each day. There are people depending on you!
    PJM

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  4. Hi, I just found this blog through Blogs of Note and it's good fun!
    I will try the contest tomorrow but don't feel confident; we don't have too many cowboys in the UK!
    Bazza’s Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

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  5. More info on Wiedemann Beer: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Wiedemann

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  6. Okay, you guys don't really eat that stuff do you? Tell me it's just a joke played on newbies... like the first day of high school we upperclassmen would tell the freshman about the pool up on the roof. I ate haggis once but this crosses the line.

    John

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  7. John,
    Blog management regrets to inform you, that yes, when Calves, sheep and goats are "marked", nothing goes to waste. I used to work summers castrating sheep, and the rancher would have a bucket that they were thrown in for later deep frying. I can say that I have never eaten one, but have been to many "Calf Fries", where that is what is served. After doing the castrating, I could never imagine eating them. I have been told that they are quiet delicious, and if you have ever eaten "Sweet Breads" from a cow, it is said to be a lot like that.
    PJM

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  8. Sweetbreads! What a delightfully misleading monicker. At least I thought so when standing on line at the buffet table during a friend's wedding. The server, thankfully, had a conscience and let me in on the secret.

    I have witnessed the artificial insemination of Black Angus cows. The vet performing the task wore a plastic bag over one arm up to the shoulder. They called him "The Man with the Golden Arm".

    John

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  9. Many years ago I was at the VFW and they had a Rocky Mountain Oyster fry. After eating my fill and ask if I could take some home to my wife. When I got home I offered her some "Fried Oyster." She ate all of them with great relish. So the next timne They had a feed at the VFW, I ash her if she wanted to get some more of those fried oyster. She hurried and got ready and away we went. I don
    t think I told what they really were for 4 or 5 times. She gopt a little P.O. at me, but she went again.

    And yes they are great and when done right, you can't tell them from real fried oysters.
    But don't get me wrong, they can be fixed wrong and aren't worth eating.

    I have never had the chance to try sweetbread , but would relish the chance to do it.

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  10. What a great way to end the year - Rocky Mtn. Oysters. Indeed!

    Happy 2011.

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  11. happy new years to all,,
    oldbear !

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  12. Ugh, Rocky Oysters, noes! :p What do the readers get if they win? You should cook us breakfast lol

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  13. Happy New Year to you and your family...

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  14. I was working the drilling rigs (in this case, natural gas) in the Williston basin area of West Dakota/Eastern Montanan near Medicine Lake, Montana one winter. We had a 30 day stretch (Jan/Feb) when it didn't get above 0 degrees F., + we had a spell of wind chill down to -60F. Spent some evenings trying to warm up in the bar in Medicine Lake and met a AUTHENTIC cowboy/wrangler by the name of NOEL LAVALLE; apppeared to be a French/Indian perhaps. He was wintering in the local hotel and was probably in his 50's at least at that time , 1982 +/-. He was born in a soddy and lived his life near there, (vast praire). I have Googled and searched but have been unable to find anyone meeting his description to date.
    I have been following your OPD site for a couple of years and enjoy it almost daily.
    I'm wondering why most of the pictures this week have been of Montana ranchhands and not your state of residence.
    Hey; If you could find a photo of NOEL LAVALLE, I could possible win the "MYSTERY PERSON" contest tomorrow.
    Be well, SJB/brokedown

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  15. brokedown,
    Yes most of the pictures were from Montana, not Texas. It is actually hard to find photographs of cowboys . . . they must have been camera shy, or photographers never made it out on the range more. I wish there were more photos of the mid to late 1800's cowboys.
    PJM

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  16. happy new year to all, its already 2011 on my side of the globe....

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  17. I am new to this. I really enjoy history and find black and white photos to be very interesting. I just started a blog for my own thoughts. I'll try your contest tomorrow. If I win I'll be over for breakfast.

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  18. What a great way to end the year - Rocky Mtn. Oysters. Indeed!

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