Thursday, December 23, 2010

Pascual Orozco


Bandit Week continues here at OPOD with this picture of Pascual Orozco. Don't let his boyish look and dapper suit mislead you, Pascual was pure bandit, through and through. As a start, during the Mexican Revolution of 1910, he was an insurrecto general, and Pancho Villa actually reported TO him. If that does not give you bandit cred, I don't know what does. I actually wish the bandits had created some sort of organization chart, as I find it very difficult to sort through who was on which side during the revolution, and who reported to whom. I guess they did not do this, as it appears to have been a loose knit operation, with allegiances constantly changing. In any event, it appears that Pascual was higher in the organization than Pancho Villa. Perhaps to better convince you of his Bandit Worthiness, I should show the following picture of him.


In this picture he literally defines the Bandit Chique look. With this outfit he would be equally at home attending a cock fight, dancing the night away at one of San Antonio's finest night clubs, or leading a cross-border cattle raid with the Texas Rangers in hot pursuit. His fine gold watch ensures that he is never late for any engagement, and that he shows up looking polished. Note he is sporting the bandit's best friend, the Colt 45 peacemaker, a model 94 winchester, and ammunition belts for BOTH weapons, with enough cartridges for any event that might come his way. I like to consider Pascual Orozco the Gentleman Bandit, able to adapt to almost any situation.

OK, a little more background on Pascual. As a young man, he made a wise investment in a gold mine that made him a very wealthy fellow. He then took some of his money, and developed gold mines of his own. This was successful, and he ended up a man of significant wealth. With that wealth, he was able to not only outfit himself, but was able to provide financing for the insurrecto movement. This financing, combined with his daunting appearance, led to him quickly moving up in the revolution hierarchy. Early in the movement, we was a gun runner, purchasing guns in the United States, and then transporting them to Mexico to help arm the insurrection. He was opposed to the Diaz government, and supported Madero's call to overthrow the Diaz government. He was a general in the insurrection, and achieved a number of notable victories over the Federales. After one victory, he stripped the dead Federales, and sent the uniforms to Diaz with a note, "Here are the wrappers, now please send some more Tamales". That has to be one of the best Bandit quotes of all times.

When the insurrection was successful, and Madero was made president, Pascual thought he would be put in charge of the new Mexican Army. Madero instead put Carranza in charge. This did not sit well with Pascual, and he was also upset that Madero did not institute land reforms, which had been one of the main reasons for the revolution. He then helped organize a rebellion against Madero. He helped finance the revolt with his own wealth, as well as organizing a cattle rustling operation where he would steal cattle, sell them in Texas, buy arms and then bring them back into Mexico. He was instrumental in bringing down the Madero government, and supported Huerta as president to replace Madero.

When Huerta's government fell, Pascual went into exile in the United Sates. While in the United States he immediately started making plans to retake Mexico. These plans ran afoul of the U.S. neutrality laws, so Pascual was arrested. He escaped from jail in El Paso, and made a run for the border. Along the way, he decided to raid a ranch in West Texas. The ranch owner organized a posse of Texas Rangers, and they overtook Pascual near Lobo, Texas. A gun battle ensued in which Pascual was killed.

A fitting end, I say, as a true Bandit should die with his boot on in battle, and never of old age.

19 comments:

  1. Well it all depends if you are bandit you don't necessary have to die young. People in those days had more respect to other. This is my opinion

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  2. That is one dapper-bandit. I can see the revolver on his right hip - but where is his second gun, is he leaning on it with his right arm?

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  3. Distilled,
    Yes, he is leaning on his rifle. One hopes that in actual battle he would carry a second pistol on his other hip.
    PJM

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  4. Who keeps giving me the thumbs down? These were some good pictures. If you all keep giving me thumbs down, I am going to disable the thumbs down button, and just leave the thumbs up button. That will fix you.
    PJM

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  5. What a great blog. I really like the background historical information to go along with the photos.

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  6. R.C.T.,
    Thank you for the kind words, and hope you will check back often.
    PJM

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  7. Excelent blog! Very good content!
    Take a look at mine at http://www.frisontech.com.br
    or just http://frisontech.com.br
    See you!

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  8. Love what you are doing here! Keep it up because I know my gf loves her makeup!

    BK
    Read http://bdbkdaily.blogspot.com/ for a funny read!

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  9. You would think that he ran out of ammo in time in the past. Heis now carring enough ammo to fight for several days without restocking. And he probably had his saddle bags full of spare ammo also.

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  10. Roger,
    Welcome back, we have missed you. We have grown accustomed to your 5:54 AM comments.
    PJM

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  11. Well, you must have slept in. I had to go to work and you didn't post until 8:30. Only 1 more week and I will be retired. I am down to counting the seconds now. About 600,000 seconds left. Well matbe minutes would be better. About 10,000 of them left

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  12. apparently senor orozco did not pack enough ammo during that posse chase which ended near lobo.... VERY NICE BLOG... thanks pjm!!

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  13. or maybe his horse just was not fast enough...

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  14. Mexico has always been one of my favorite places, although it is such a poor and corruput country.

    With all of the drug cartel violence going on now, we're afraid to travel there.

    I'm waiting for Cuba.

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  16. I didn't expect to see even more Mexico photos after the Mexican market & paddler! The trilogy (your three posts) on the Mexican Revolution was a very welcomed sight. The photos are very interesting to observe, as are your stories and historical renditions on these Mexican bandits. Though may I ask – what are your sources?

    Here's a Mexico story that may interest you: Edward Merrin and the origins of the gallery

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  17. I was just checking out your blog when the name "Orozco" caught my attention. It's my mother's maiden name. I don't know if there is any family connection to Pascual, but he certainly does bear a striking resemblence to my grandfather. It's a wonderful blog. Keep up the great stories and photos!

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