Sunday, December 19, 2010

Mexican Bandit


This week we are going to move South of the Border and look at Mexican Bandits and Revolutionaries. What better way to start the week than with this picture of the quintessential Revolutionary . . . José Doroteo Arango Arámbula, aka Francisco Villa, aka Pancho Villa. I like this picture of him because of the classic Bandoliers over his sholders forming an "X" across the chest. I would have preferred he have more actual weaponry in view, but I guess you can not have it all. Also, a little wider brim on the hat would have been nice, giving a little more of a sombrero look.

I find Mexican History to be fascinating. The 1800's and early 1900's appear to be one revolution after another. The central government would be corrupt, and then populist revolutionaries would appear to challenge the central government, but often times these revolutionaries were just as corrupt as the central government. It is interesting to try and figure out why the US evolved into a more stable government and society in the same time period. 

Wow, was that a Wild and Crazy Mystery Person Contest yesterday. The guesses were coming fast and furious. It was all I could do to keep up with all the contest entries. By midmorning I was becoming more confident that no one would get it, as it appeared my Arch-Nemesis the Evil Nate Maas had been stumped. While I did not get to have my victory breakfast this morning, I will admit that since no one had guessed it by lunch, I did have a splendid victory lunch.


I made that BBQ Brisket, and it was about the best I ever had. EAM made the potato salad and home made bread, and Mrs. PJM made the pinto beans. Now, zoom in and look at that piece of Brisket. The meat displays the highly sought after "Smoke Ring" which is the red area along the outside of the meat. I bet you have never seen such a big smoke ring. It goes half way into the meat. I have a secret formula for making such a large smoke ring. Unfortunately, I will be unable to share this most important secret with you, lest the Evil Nate Maas steals the recipe. 

There continues to be strange goings on out in Chickie Town. Handsome Jack's construction project is moving forward. He has the whole area cordoned off, but I was able to sneak in and snap a few pictures.


It looks like a large flat construction pad has been assembled.

In the picture below you can see Handsome Jack sitting on the solar panels watching over the construction site.


I will keep you posted as I learn more of what that bird is up to.

I don't have more pictures from Chickie Town right now. The chickies are molting right now, and don't want their pictures taken. They are a mess, as they have lost their feathers. Egg production is down from 9-10 eggs a day to about 3 eggs a day. Egg production is hurt when the chickies molt, and also when the days are short. I have a light on a timer in the Chickie Coop. If I turn it on, it will help get egg production back up, but if you use artificial light to increase egg production, the chickies do not live as long. So, as long as they produce enough for us to eat, I will leave the light off.

37 comments:

  1. dat big smok ring on dat meat not a big deal. I tells you how to git de big smok ring. Yu leaves the briket in de cure fo about four days. De longer yous leaves de brisket in de cure, de bigger de smoke ring gits. I leaves it bout 5 days and de smoke ring goes all de way thru de meat. Dats your gots to do.

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  2. Years ago, I knew a lady who told me that Pancho Villa was her great uncle, and that that family circle lived in a rural area of Mexico where people kept some kind of cat as livestock, to butcher for meat. I remember being stunned and found it hard to believe, and I asked her some questions about it - she said that the cats were very like normal house cats or ally cats, but taller or lankier. I have never heard of anything like that again, have you? She was a person who I think of still as a very serious person, she would take me on her rounds once in a while, to let me see how "real life" was for her, we would stay busy bringing things to needy friends, buying small items from wholesalers to retail up to people she had as clients, check up on her relatives, etc - never a dull moment, but never one prank or gratuitous action, so I really have to think she was telling me a true story. I just wish I had been old enough to know her as an adult and really ask some solid questions about cats as livestock in turn of the century Mexico - talk about herding cats!!!

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  3. Is that your solar panels that are right next to the construction area? And the other day I saw a tower, that I guess was from a wind charger. Was that yours also?
    Also in one photo there was some PVC pipe sticking out of the ground, could you explain that?

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  4. edhuse,
    I can believe people would raise and eat cats. Cats are foragers, and can feed themselves. So, for a poor family, eating cats makes sense, although many today would find it objectionable, they are not hungry.
    PJM

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  5. Roger,
    Yes, the solar installation can be seen in the picture. Also, the tower you saw is our wind turbine. Between wind turbine and solar panels, we are producing more electricity than we use.

    Yes, there was a PVC pipe sticking out of the ground. We have a septic tank and there is a small PVC pipe sticking out the ground. Problem is that people kept running over the pipe, and breaking it. So, I put a large pipe over it so people could see it, and stop backing over it.

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  6. Is that Handsome Jack sitting on top of the solar panel managing the project.

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  7. Yes Roger, that is Handsome Jack. He is not supposed to be on the Solar Panels, as he leaves a mess behind. Also, he is not supposed to be on the greenhouse, as he leaves a mess behind. Would you like to hazard a guess about the two places he and his posse spend most of their time?
    PJM

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  8. Aren't those items on your land.
    If so, why are they driving on your land with that heavy equipment? Aren't you worried that they will cave in your septic system, or at least do some damage to it? I think you need to have a talk with Handsome Jack.

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  9. Roger,
    The septic tank is about 250 yards from the house, and not near the construction site.
    PJM

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  10. That brisket looks so goood! I wish we could get brisket in Newfoundland! I'm hungry.

    I guess I'll have to wait until I'm in Houston in January.

    I too, am curious to what the peacock is up to.

    Graham

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  11. Given it's location, it appears HJM may be constructing a roadside produce and vegetable stand.

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  12. Beautiful brisket, PJM! That looks to me like a well deserved victory lunch, there were many wild guesses (like mine, although I did get to spend a wonderful morning learning about history) for you to wade through.

    @Graham, you could have a traditional Newfoundland jiggs dinner which is some mighty fine eating. Or you could make the trek to Quebec for some delicious smoked meat.

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  13. This picture of a Mexican revolutionary really brought back some memories for me. My grandfather, after having fought in the Spanish American war ( he tried to join the Roughriders, but they were full, so he and his brother joined another squadron. After the war, he went to Mexico and became an overseer of a vanilla plantation near Cordoba (which is near Veracruz). He met and married my grandma in San Antonio, took her back to Cordoba where they raised two sons. During the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1920, they had to escape with just the clothes on their backs and a few bags and hid out in the British embassy in Veracruz, as the revolutionaries were seeking out and shooting Americans in their area. They were rescued by a Marine gunboat and taken to Corpus Christi. So, I guess if it weren't for the Mexican Revolution, I wouldn't be here!

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  14. Arizona is badly in need of a good BBQ beef. I currently live out of the country, but when I return I will be opening a restaurant with smoked pulled pork and BBQ brisket, ribs and chuck. I have been searching for the perfect recipe, but have yet to find it. I will have to experiment for a year or so to come up with the best flavor I can get...unless someone chooses to pass his recipe on so it can live in glory in another state. Imagine the gratitude of your brothers in Arizona if they are able to buy a PJM smoked brisket some day!

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  15. When I was a kid in the 50s, all the students at Hamilton Jr. High knew that the fellow selling tamales from a pushcart on Heights Blvd. in Houston made his tamales from cats. Of course, none of the adults believed us until he was caught in an alley one night with a trap baited with a female cat in one end of the box.
    Good tamales, though.

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  16. Congrats on being a blog of note! Your blog is really fun and interesting. The photos are amazing!

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  17. I really enjoy your blog the photos are very amazing....

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  18. Charity, shame on ya fo bloggin on da Lods day. Youf been ackin funny evah on account o thet fancy pants tracta driva came aroun.

    Da part mah sister lef out about thsmoke rin is thet ya need tuse wet wood cuz it prodooce da bess smoke an effn yer hankerin tmake shonuff ya git a fine rin, coat da meat wif salt tennerizer.

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  19. Hi!
    Your blog is really amazing! I'm new here ans my blog is about the 1920's, so you can imagine how I do love old photographs! THis image of the mexican revolutionary brought many references to me. I'm brazilian, so this guy really looks like some kind of "revolutionary" people we had here in the beggining of the XXth century... they habe been known as the "cangaceiros" as a reference to "cangaço" the geographical region they came from. The most emblematic figures among them are Lampião and his wife, Maria Bonita... amazing!

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  20. zerelda yu jes hush yo mouth. Yu don no de fust ting bout the smoke ring. De only smokin yus nows bout is dat wild weed what grows out behind de goat pen.

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  21. an ise de one dat nows how to make de Con Brad.

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  22. Oh, Charity, tell me ya didnt gib da carnbread recipe ta thet PJM feller!

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  23. Have you read "An American Family" about William F. Buckley's father and mother? Buckley's father was an attorney in Mexico during the this time period and even had a run-in with Pancho Villa. It's a very interesting book.

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  24. zarelda you best jes hush on up fo I tells da folks bout how ol bline peaty got his nikname. members how he wents from jes plain ol peaty to bline peaty?

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  25. Any guesses what PJM is building? I'm guessing a helicopter pad for his gunship. Too small to be a landing strip.

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  26. Ya still gloatin on over thet one? Shonuff ah knows it. Ahs tell it fo dem thet aint heard, cuss it all tarnation. Peaty used tcome a callin on me hyar at home. an ah dont give him enny interess on account o he cudnt hunt ta sabe hiss lif, so tmake me jealous en all he started acomin roun tsee ya. Effn ah recall corecly, thass when foks rond heyar qit callin him Peaty ana started callin him Blind Peaty.

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  27. Zarelda yu do like to spin da yarn. u forgots to tell de part bout de moonshine. yu wanted to put a litle kik in de moonshine and wents to cuttin id de pur de keroseen into de cone mash. yu goes to callin it yo red tunder. dat peaty boy comes and what wans to try de red tunder. yu gives him sum and he falls flat over on de flo. dat boy nebber saw nuttin after dat, and dat why he now nown as blind peaty. sum folks say he neber right in his hade after he drank dat red tunder.

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  28. Caint blame me effn a man kint hanle his likker. Is ya lookin ta git mah recipe fo thet tracta man crush of yourn? ahs tell ya, he might nevah git drunk inough agin tcome courtin, so ahd give up hope effn ah was ya.

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  29. Wow! cool blog! I happen to have many of my families old photos, my great-grandfather raised me...old photos are the best!
    motherhoodmusicandbeer.blogspot.com

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  30. I think all Gentleman Farmers should check this link.

    http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=s111-510

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  31. Looks like the slab for Mr.and Mrs. Mc's COUNTRY STORE, INC.
    Hydroponic fresh vegies, yard fresh eggs from happy hens.
    BUT WAIT!!THERE IS MORE!!!
    The best brisket in Texas slooooo cooked. And it is all produced, energy free. There ain't nothing wrong with that.
    Al

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  32. My husband always talks about Pancho Villa. It is apart of his family history. He was told many stories about him as a child as his great-grandfather on his monther's side served under him. He was told as a child he was related to him. He isnt clear on the history but does know that his grandfather served under him. I laugh every time a see photos of this man as I always say yes you must be related as you sure do look like him. lol :0
    Thank you for sharing your stories and the old photos. I am new at this and so love reading about history and seeing the photos. Your page is great! Look forward to learnignalot from your site.

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  33. Pancho Villa--interesting choice for a photograph.

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  34. I believe that the difference in Mexico and the US and how their development went lies in the difference between our cultures. I could have sworn that I read in one of my text books in college that Mexico has a better good culture. It's been 15 years, so I might not remember it exactly right. The idea being that if you do better than your neighbor, then your neighbor will pull you down. In other words accuse you of witch craft or something. So noone tries to do better than anyone else. (Of course look at what happened in Salem, so maybe I'm off track.) The US was founded by the Puritans who were very strict and had a stringent work ethic. It was OK to do better than you neighbor. If your neighbor wasn't doing as well perhaps he wasn't working hard enough. I wish I had my textbook still, but it's been 15 years. So my explanation comes out sounding a bit stereotypical which is not my intent.

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  35. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  36. till now on Mexican Bandit still alive annoy us

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