Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Testing the Soup


This morning's picture is from 1942, and shows a woman testing the soup. Looks like she has her pressure cooker out as well, so perhaps she is going to can the soup as well.

Yesterday, Potamiaen asked for Mrs. PJM's green chili soup recipe. I am happy to share it with you. But first, if really needs roasted green chili, not canned. If you don't have roasted, buy some of the green ones in the grocery store vegetable area. Then roast them on your BBQ grill, or you can roast them by holding them one at a time over the stovetop burner. The outside really needs to be burned to get that rich roasted flavor in the chili.


EAM has made a WEB site which feature's Mrs. PJM's recipes, and here is her Green Chili Soup recipe:


http://www.myhomecooking.net/soup-recipes/green-chili-soup-recipe.htm

14 comments:

  1. Thank you for the Green Chili Soup Recipe. I would have liked to taste this ladies soup. No MSG, no hormones, no preservatives. Yummm.

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  2. Another thought. I have recipe books from the 1930's and 40's and in one I read "--be sure to use an aluminum pan --"

    Times do change.

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  3. Yes Rebecca2, now days it should say "Do not use an aluminum pan"
    How dumb were we? When we scrubbed an aluminum pan and saw all that gray stuff coming off of it. Why didn't we think to ourselves "Gee, I wonder if that is coming off when we cook with it and getting into our body".
    I read a report 35 or 40 years ago linking the use of aluminum cooking utensil to Alzheimer's disease. Since that day I throw out all aliminum cookwear have never used any since.

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  4. Here part of a report on aluminum cookware.

    For many years, people already know how aluminum salts can leach from a pan or pot and onto the food being cooked, especially if it is acidic. This is the very reason why aluminum-lined cookware is strictly prohibited in some countries like France, Germany, Great Britain, Belgium, Hungary, Brazil and Switzerland.

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  5. Best investment I've made in a while was a micaceous clay bean pot from a local Apache. Makes "never fail" black bean soup.

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  6. That pressure cooker looks like something she'd use for canning. In 1942 that would have been de rigeur.

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  7. To me that pressure canner does not look to have the larger circumference needed for a canning pressure cooker. They held about 7 quart jars and a wire frame to lift them out. Interesting photo, I'd give my right arm to have that wood cook stove....

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  8. My Grandma had a wood stove in her kitchen. She lived NM and she used to make the best tortillas and green chili. It would be really cool to have a stove like that but I sure don't have room for it in my kitchen..

    I would hate to have to dress up that much to cook. It looks like she has on hose and all. Thank goodness the times have changed in that regard.

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  9. I should have added to that recipe that I don't use MSG myself, but I presented the recipe in its entirety.

    Salt is a preservative, as is sugar. Just throwing that out there.

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  10. You say you would like a wood stove like that lady has. Until you have to get the wood, stack it both inside and outside.
    Light the fire, try to regulate the heat from it. That is a fine art, being able to regulate the heat on a wood stove
    Then there is always the hauling out of the ashes.
    Yeah the nice wood stove would last about 2 days, and out it would go for a nice gas or electric stove.

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  11. I'm forwarding the site to my sister who's the chef and baker in our family.

    I'm looking forward to having her make me stuff.

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  12. I sure hates me some picture embargo.

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  13. Merci pour les très belles photographies, j'aime votre blog et je poste pour la première fois.
    Amicalement
    Sylvie de France.

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  14. I wonder how many readers use a pressure cooker today? They are ubiquitous here in India, where cooking fuel of all kinds is in short supply. 60% of all meals in India are cooked over solid fuel (wood, charcoal or cow dung), the rest with kerosene or LPG. No one relies on electricity for their main cooking, because there are 'power cuts' almost every day. Besides, electricity would be the most expensive way to cook.
    --BangalOREgon Gal

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