Friday, October 15, 2010

American Soda Fountain


Today's picture was taken in 1910, and shows the American Soda Fountain in Washington DC.

I enjoyed the comments yesterday describing a few remaining soda fountains in the US. In Dublin, Texas, there is the oldest Dr. Pepper bottler in the country. They still use the ORIGINAL formula using Pure Cain Sugar instead of corn syrup, and they have an old fashioned soda fountain. I don't drink much soda pop, but let me tell you that those they serve at the Dublin soda fountain are really something great. I think the sodas made at a fountain have a stronger "bite" from the carbonation, and canned sodas can not compare. Also, I think that the sodas made with real sugar have a much better flavor than the corn syrup ones typically canned today.

14 comments:

  1. In Australia they have bottles of "double sars" - which is double strength sasparilla, or what we now call root beer. It reminds me very strongly of the fountain drinks we used to get.

    Remember fountain milkshakes? You could order chocolate strawberry vanilla.....

    -XC

    PS - I think you mean "cane".

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  2. I've tried Mexican Coca-Cola with cane sugar, and didn't like it as much as I expected. But that's probably because it has less carbonation, so doesn't have as much bite.

    Miss Chef has been making ginger ale at home. It's surprisingly easy, requires only an empty 2-liter bottle, and only takes 2 or 3 days to "brew." Ingredients are ginger, sugar and lemon (though she's experimented with honey as a sweetener). Every batch is unique.

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  3. What in the world is an Egg Phosphate ? Maybe thats why the corner drug stores went out of bis..... LOL

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  4. Apparently 'egg' drinks were common and were produced using a variety of recipes.

    Given that ice cream sodas are a frozen egg-based treat, these other egg drinks don't seem so wierd.

    We used to get root beer at the Dog and Suds back when they had drive-ins and car hops and their root beer was amazing. Nothing like what you get in a can or bottle these days.

    It was very creamy and richly flavored. It produced a very thick and frothy 'head.' Man those were great! ANd as a special treat, sometimes we'd get a gallon jug to take home and savor.

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  5. Sure hope that's pure cane sugar not pure Cain. ;) Wooo-ee!

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  6. When my Dad was a teenager, he was a soda jerk in San Antonio, Texas. He said that "ammoniated coke" was all the rage one summer. Has anyone ever heard of "ammoniated coke?"

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  7. Ammonia Coke

    Sort of an early 'Red Bull' type concoction I guess?

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  8. I have heard of ammoniated Coke. My late husband would ask for one from time to time, especially if he wasn't feeling well. (altho he "enjoyed poor health" to be honest.)The soda jerk would take a little bottle and pour something into the glass before he drew the soda. I doubt it was regular ammonia, though.

    We used to make our own root beer when I was a kid. A five gallon crock, a cake of yeast, some sugar and root beer extract. After it was made, we'd bottle it in the old bottles that would normally be returned for deposit. (Today's bottles probably aren't sturdy enough.) My dad was working at Crown Cork & Seal at the time, and would bring home bags of bottle tops. We'd match the tops to the bottles, and then snicker when an unsuspecting guest would open what seemed to be a bottle of Pepsi, sip it, look at the bottle, sip it again, and then shrug.

    Ther ewas no way to stop the fermentation, so by the end of the season, we had to open the bottles on the back porch, pointed away from us, because the excess carbinaion would make the soda shoot halfway across the yard. It was a lethal weapon!

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  9. I remember my dad trying to make root beet one summer. We were all excited until the glass bottles started blowing up!! So he carted the rest down to the alley and shot them with a BB gun. Petty scary when we were kids thinking one would blow up while he was moving them.
    Lea

    Hi Smart Girl.
    Lea is not my real name. I have an unusual name so I usually just go by Lea to everyone except for family and close friends. Sounds like "Leah" but spelled Lea. My real name is Letha, pronounced with a long "E". Everyone says... Ohhh Lisa... thinking I have a lisp!!! LOL After many many years of correcting my name ... I finally just gave up.

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  10. Went to grade school with a girl named Letha.

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  11. My grandmother's name was Letha

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  12. My great aunt's name was Letha - she was a wonderful and giving woman.

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  13. Mr. PJM, haven't you seen the ads?? Corn sugar is real sugar! And your body can't tell the difference.

    (What a load of crock. Another instance of being lied to so they can make a buck.)

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  14. I've been to Dr Pepper in Dublin, TX many times -- you have to return your bottles if you want to buy the ones bottled there -- which they only do once a week or so. Otherwise you can get the canned ones or disposable bottles, both of which are bottled someplace else like Oklahoma. Also there is a soda fountain at the Dr Pepper Museum in Waco.

    I grew up in Austin -- used to have a soda fountain in Walgreens when I was in grade school in the 1960s -- we went there with our teacher as a reward for 100 on every spelling test and had banana splits.

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