Sunday, August 22, 2010

Alfred Vanderbilt

Welcome to Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous Week on OPOD. This week we will be looking at pictures of the uber-rich, and perhaps trying to figure out if they are really happier than the rest of us. Today's picture is of Alfred Vanderbilt. The picture was taken in 1907. Alfred was an avid sportsman. He died in 1915, with the sinking of the Lusitania.

16 comments:

  1. Is there a lesson here..money cannot make you float? It should be a fun week! :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. So there will be peace in our time between The Evil Nate Maas and the Super Nemesis PJM.
    Well, if that's what it take to settle the feud is a pie in my face, so be it.
    But if I am to be the target of the Cream Pie duel, then I want to switch to either Banana Cream Pie or Lemon Meringue pie. Just as well be able to eat what I get on my face. I would be less apt to duck. I really don't like Chocolate.

    I voted YES. The less rich seem to have a lot of fun, and enjoy life. But are they truly happy. I'm sure that they worry about making that next car or house payment, or will they be able to cover next months rent.
    I know some people don't care about bills as long as they can have fun, but sooner or later they have to face up to the fact they owe money. Then the fun stops and the fretting starts.
    I for one can't stand to have overdue bills out there. I was brought up to pay all my bills when they come up. When I was young I worked 1 full time job and 2 part time jobs to make sure all bills were paid when due. I also was able to have some fun along the way. But it sure would have been nice not to have to work so hard and spend more time with my family like the UBER RICH can. Sure there are rich people that run around doing their thing and, giving their kids ponies and fancy birthday parties, taking fantastic vacations were is the fun in that. Oh wait, that is fun.

    Hey were is the domistic update? It is Sunday and I have waited all week for it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. i actually think the rich can be happier than the rest of us but in fact whine about the dumbest things, such as they want to get rich and famous but once they do they cry like babies if anyone take their picture . selling pictures of their children to the press for millions is just plain absurd. money can buy happiness if you know how to spend it . have a great week everyone ill see ya tommorrow.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Roger, I'm with you, Lemon Meringue or Coconut Cream any day over Boston Cream.

    ReplyDelete
  5. it might sting a little but pumpkin pie is better

    ReplyDelete
  6. Uber rich usually are a bit nutty. With that - who is truly happy?

    ReplyDelete
  7. One of the stories I read years ago, on the Lusitania, was Alfred was last seen in the ships nursery lashing life jackets to babies cribs ....

    A noble attempt to help

    ReplyDelete
  8. Here's my take on who's happier. The adults might be tickled pink. But some of the children who are only shown love by how much $$ and huge gifts are bestowed upon them or the attention given them by a high priced nanny might have a different opinion. There is no substitute for a mother and fathers love and attention.

    ReplyDelete
  9. How about one of Corneilus Vanderilt. He was probably happier than Alfred because he lived to a pretty ripe old age for the time and built the fabulous Biltmore home place in North Carolina. Lots of kids,relatives and friends helped him enjoy the place for many years. Thankfully, the following generation took up the challenge to save the mansion so others could enjoy it. I fully recommend it as a destination in anyones travel plans.

    ReplyDelete
  10. As Al said, a trip to the Biltmore House is well worth the trip. The secret to being happy - rich or not - may lie is being helpful and kind.

    Alfred spend his dying moments trying to save others. Corneilius treated his help beautifully, with private rooms equiped with electric lights and so forth. The children of the servants were sent to school, as well as being trained as household help and other trades - shoemaker, etc. He also built a church, All Souls, for the use of his family, servants, and the people he brought in from overseas to help with the construction of the mansion. The church was equiped with running water in the (indoor) rest rooms and the sacristy. All this is 1896; the White House did not get indoor plumbing until 1905.

    His Christmas list for his help was carefully selected for the individuals involved, and when the weather was threatening his wife Edith was often seen riding a tractor to help bring in the crops. Nice people. I think we would have liked them.

    ReplyDelete
  11. There isn't a day that I don't worry about money. Yes. It is a happier situation if you do not have that constant worry.

    Love your blog!! :))

    ReplyDelete
  12. Un retrato con mucha presencia. Interesantes detalles. Joe

    ReplyDelete
  13. Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt (1877-1915), who died on the Lusitania, was the third son of Cornelius Vanderbilt II, who built “The Breakers” mansion in Newport, RI in 1895.

    Cornelius II and his wife Alice had six children - William H. Vanderbilt II, who died of typhoid fever while in his junior year at Yale; Cornelius III, who was disinherited for marrying someone the family didn’t approve of; Alfred G., who died on the Lusitania, and Reginald C. Vanderbilt, who was a no-good party boy, an alcoholic and the father of Gloria Vanderbilt, the famous fashion designer.

    There were also two daughters, Gertrude and Gladys, one of whom eventually inherited The Breakers and turned it over to the Newport Preservation Society with much of its original furnishings intact.

    Gloria Vanderbilt was the product of Reginald’s second marriage to Gloria Laura Mercedes Morgan, and her father died from alcoholism when she was two years old. The control of her trust fund then passed to her mother, and little Gloria eventually became the focus of a highly publicized and nasty custody battle between her mother and one of her father’s sisters - Gertrude - during which her mother was accused of being a lesbian. Her aunt Gertrude won the suit.

    Gloria Vanderbilt’s surviving son is Anderson Cooper, the CNN news anchor.

    So . . . . .the guy in this photo is Gloria Vanderbilt’s uncle, and Anderson Cooper’s great uncle!!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Years and years ago my husband and I had taken a vacation through the southeastern United States. As we approached North Carolina we kept seeing billboards advertising the Biltmore, so we decided we'd go. When we got to the gates, we saw that it was going to cost $4.00 each to get in (that was about twice the cost of a movie ticket). I said there was No Way I was going to pay that much for looking at a rich man's house.

    Oh, how I wish now that we had.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Last year I read a biography of Brooke Astor. Was she happy? I don't know, but she sure left an unhappy family.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Your Portrait is good to be on the top of Kaaba
    Saudi Arabia

    ReplyDelete