Sunday, April 25, 2010

Berliner Helicopter

This is a picture of an early attempt at a helicopter. It was called the Berliner Helicopter. I am not sure exactly how this works. It appears to no be a gyro-copter, as I can not see any forward or rearward pointing propellers. The propellers are mounted on beams coming out of the plane, and I see little to no front wing. It appears that the vertical propellers are powered. It does not look like they can change position. So, an interesting aircraft, and I ma not sure exactly how it flies.

Domestic Update:

Things continue to be interesting out in Chickie Town. The chickies are doing fine, and are producing 9-10 eggs a day. I have had a little bit of an issue that a few of the eggs have had thin shells. This is from a calcium deficiency. I put out crushed oyster shells for them, but maybe they are not eating enough of them. So, I continue to monitor the situation, but am not sure what is going on.

 

The peacocks have been acting peculiar lately. Handsome spends about 10 hours a day with his feathers fanned out, dancing around. So far, Lovie appears to show no interest in him. If she is around, and he starts that, she walks over and gives him a great big peck. Also, the peacocks are running around in circles real fast, sometimes running into things. Also, Handsome has started making all these elaborate noises. They are real loud and hard to describe. It sort of sounds like a cat meow, but only over a bull horn. He does this all day long, and at night at least once every fifteen minutes like clockwork. His tail-feathers are not that impressive yet, and I think they are not enough to get Lovie's attention.

 

Now, I went out to gather eggs this morning, and found a HUGE egg in the chickie coop. At first I thought that a chickie had laid a huge egg, but upon inspection by Mrs. PJM, she said there was no way that one of those little chickies had laid the egg. The obvious conclusion is that Lovie  went into the chickie coop and laid the egg. Now, I am not sure what to do with it. I have seen no indications that would make me think that the egg would have any chance of making a baby peacock . . . however, on the off chance that I missed something, I have decided to perhaps leave it and see if Lovie tries to make a nest there.

10 comments:

  1. This helicopter was built in 1924. It was the first controlled helicopter that used vertical take off unlike the regular air planes. It went a speed of 40 mph. This helicopter opened the way for many more models to come.
    It also had a little propeller on top of the tail section about 3 feet ahead of the tail.
    R

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  2. You could candle the egg and see if it fertilized. Who knows maybe tomorrow you will have 2 big eggs.
    R

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  3. Maybe someone with Peacock experence will make some comments.
    Or you could ask the lady who you got them from about their actions.
    R

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  4. I love Chickie Town updates!!

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  5. Oh your comments on the peacock noises confirms everything I've heard about peacocks. I think I will stick with my guiena hens. At least they are quiet at night! Interesting airplane or whatever it is.

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  6. I'm familiar with that 2-note call from peacocks. Have you experienced the honking one yet? I refer to it sounding similar to a clarinet warming up. Whenever I hear it I think Benny Goodman.

    Love Chickie Town updates.

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  7. Mabellyne,
    Yes, they in fact do honk. Some times it is the multi-honk followed by the two tone call. ANY time they fly they honk the whole way, one honk for each flap of the wings. It is like they need the honking to keep them in flight. In that respect, they sound just like a wild turkey.
    PJM

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  8. Your peacocks are too funny.
    I love your chickie town updaytes also.
    R

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  9. My dad once kept peacocks at his ranch in the Texas Hill Country. He had always wanted them now that he was a retired gentleman farmer, so he was initially puzzled that a local rancher was willing to sell them for such a low price. He soon understood why. Mating season. Jumping Jehosaphat, what a noise! It sounded like rapine was occuring on an hourly basis! (There were, by the way, three males and seven females) The ladies all eventually laid eggs in "scrapes", but lost both eggs and chicks to varmints as they refused to use the coop.

    Upside to peacocks--the males molt their tail feathers every year, and they are absolutely hell on snakes. Downside to peacocks--they can fly over any garden fence you care to erect and lay waste to your veggies. Oh, and their poop is so acid that it will eat through the enamel on the hood of your car all the way down to the bare metal. The fact that this happened to his brand new Caddy made my Dad go all medieval on his hapless birds. No more feathers for mother--but peaceful nights for us!

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  10. +JMJ+
    Dear PJM,
    It is probably a chicken egg. Sometimes our flock will lay eggs twice/thrice normal size. Always double yolks. Also, be sure to feed your chickens the kitchen scraps - bread, veggie, fruit rinds, even leftovers. It helps them with the minerals/stuff they need for good shelled eggs. DON'T FEED THEM EGGSHELLS or you will find peck marks in your eggs!
    Hope this helps!

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