Sunday, March 21, 2010

Sharecropper Daughter

I enjoyed Tobacco Week so much last week that I decided this week will be Sharecropper Week. We start with this picture, taken in 1935, and showing the daughter of an Alabama Sharecropper.

Mystery Person Contest Update:

Well, looks like I will have to declare myself the winner in yesterday's contest. I am really surprised no one got it, as these were not obscure figures. First the man in the white suit. He was James K. Vardaman. He was governor of Mississippi and US senator from Mississippi. His supporters were primarily blue collar workers and rural farmers and laborers. He had somewhat of a grassroots populist movement going, and his followers started wearing red neckerchiefs, and started calling themselves "Rednecks", which I guess is where that term came from.

The lovely lady was the widow of Rebel General James Longstreet. He married her later and life, and she was young. The amazing thing is that Mrs. Longstreet did not die until 1962. I was born in 1961, so I find it fascinating that I was alive at the same time as the widow of a Confederate General. Makes the war seem not so long ago.

23 comments:

  1. Congratulations PJM on your victory. Always interesting. Enjoy those crepes.

    I googled Mrs. James Longstreet and found a picture of her wearing the same dress for sale on eBay. It is dated 1913. I am guessing it was taken the same day as your photo.

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  2. No, the war really wasn't that long ago; one or two generations. We're just a culture that doesn't remember its past very well.

    So, how were those crepes? I was kind of hoping for a Victory Breakfast photo.

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  3. No comment on the photo but I was in Tractor Supply in Castroville yesterday and I saw a book that I have to tell you about! It's called "I made my own Tractor" or something very similar (my memory ain't what it used to be). It's full of plans for custom-made tractors that you can bring the parts in as you need them or can afford to buy them. So Mrs. PJM could go for that idea. You seem like you'd be able to take on such a project. When my DH and I move to our God's little five acres, we'll probably build one ourselves. We're in the process of setting up our own "chicken ranch" now.

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  4. Flartus,
    The breakfast was spectacular, with crepes made from freshly laid eggs. I was going to post a picture, but my camera battery was dead, and Mrs. PJM could not find memory card for her camera. Most excellent crepes.

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  5. Tonia,
    Unfortunately I am not a mechanic. Whenever I have tried to fix cars, it ends up costing me more than if I had not touched it. No, purchasing the tractor will be my only option. Certainly these wonderful breakfasts I am cooking are getting me closer every day.

    So happy to hear you are getting chickens. I like those little hens so much. I have had great luck with both the "Black Star" and "Easter Layers". They are very sweet chickens, voracious foragers, they get along together well, and lay lots and lots of excellent eggs.
    PJM

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  6. Congratulations PJM on your victory.
    I didn't even venture a guess
    Did you enjoy your crepes?
    I would guess you are not getting tired of those wonderful fresh eggs.
    So what is the cost per egg down to now. Must be getting near the single digit figure by now.
    R

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  7. I probably should have googled before I posted :-)

    http://www.farmshow.com/store/tractor_collection.asp

    So cool and it makes me long for a better place (at least a double lot in a nicer small town).

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  8. R.
    Egg cost is now down well below $100 per egg, but not to single digit yet. We are getting way more than we can eat, which is nice . . . eat all we want then share with friends.
    PJM

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  9. I should have checked for a response before I made the last post. :-) But who knows maybe that link will help someone else.

    We hope to be getting Amerucana's. I hope at least one will lay green eggs because I have a craft project in mind for them. I'm vegan but my DH will eat the eggs. I never liked eggs when I was an omnibore.

    I plan on taking pics and videos and will post pics on Photobucket and videos on youtube. Nothing to film yet, though. It was 31 degrees here last night and we had to move a lot of new potted plants indoors. Boo, go away winter! My DH refuses to work in the cold!

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  10. Tonia,
    Our easter egg layers are laying green and blue eggs. Sort of teal pastel in color. Very attractive eggs. They are smaller chickens, but are very good layers. They started laying before the other chickies, and have been consistent producers.
    PJM

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  11. I believe the redneck thing can also be traced to Britain as well as the coal mines of West Virginia.

    Enjoy your crepes.

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  12. Cool, there's a lady in Cibolo which is east of San Antonio that's a breeder and we hope to either get chicks or eggs to hatch from her. I'd also like to show my pet chickens at our county fair if I can get someone who's not too mixed breed. Of course, you know that easter eggers are crosses of Araucana or Ameraucana's and some other breed. Given that a well cared for pet chicken could live up to 15 years, I have done a lot of research and thinking about what I want. They will not be eaten unless there's a total economic collapse and we have no other food!

    I just had an idea. Maybe you could get a 4H-er to build it for a project. When the O'Uvaldes were O'Lubbocks, we saw a lot of farm equipment that the 4H-ers had built at the County Fair. You provide the parts, (s)he does the labor, you get the tractor. I know my brother would have jumped at the chance back when he was one.

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  13. Tonia,
    In case of complete economic collapse, we have already prioritized in which order we will eat the animals.

    1) Little Elmo, our pet shit zu. He is ill tempered, and fairy worhtless. He does not have much meat, but would maybe make one small caserole.

    2) Peacocks - Beautiful birds, but are not producing anything. They have a tendency to sit on our porch, and mess on the nice stained concrete. Would hate to see them go, but . . .

    3) Ginger - Our other little Shit Zu. Sweet dog, but hey this is survival.

    4) Chickies - Sweet, friendly, funny social, plus provide eggs. We would eat them last.

    PJM

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  14. I understand completely. The first thing we will do if there's no more food except what we can grow/gather/steal is dognap that piece of sh*t "great" dane from across the alley from us and barbeque it! The chickens, if they are still laying, will be saved until they stop being productive.

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  15. Tonia,
    I assume from your name you are from Uvalde?

    Have you thought about a greenhouse? A hydroponic greenhouse is the next project Mrs. PJM and I are considering. I am getting full blown case of Hydroponic Fever as we speak.
    PJM

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  16. You forgot to mention that Vardaman was an ardent white supremacist and racist, and even advocated lynching at one time.

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  17. Ooooooo! A greenhouse!?! I have wanted one for decades and hope to have one yet. I joined the Atlanta Orchid Society. One of the fun things they do is tours of local members own greenhouses. Of course these are orchid-centric tours, but you get to see different types of houses, and what works and doesn't in the local climate and weather conditions. One of the nearby hobbyist-turned-commercial growers has built a greenhouse that is almost entirely solar heated, something I am interested in.

    See if you can tap into a similar group in your area. Your county extension agent may have some connections too.

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  18. Marie,
    No greenhouses around here. This area is ranching and cotton farming. Greenhouses have not caught on.
    PJM

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  19. PJM,

    yer one of those young'uns I see.

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  20. Greenhouses produce a lot of heat.
    My brother lived in North Central Montana, and he had one. It didn't take him long to put in an large fan to exchange the air.
    even in the winter he had to be careful not to overheat his crops and flowers.
    R

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  21. R.
    The one I am looking at has a built in environmental control system with evaporative cooling and natural gas furnace for heating. Supposedly this system can crow tomatoes, lettuce and other vegetables year round.

    PJM

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  22. We don't have space for a greenhouse here in Uvalde but I've found a house near Helotes that I hope I can get Mr. O'U to look at Saturday. It's actually out in an unzoned area so I can have any animal that I can convince "He who is very stubborn" to let me have.
    He works in San Antonio and if we move closer to there, I'll get my husband back instead of this guy who's too tired to do anything when he's home.

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  23. The Civil War didn't seem so distant to me, either. Both of my grandfathers were born when Lincoln was president.

    My mother was born the year that World War I started in Europe and I was born shortly after the Korean War.

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