Sunday, March 7, 2010

Paparazzi

Welcome to Photographers week here at OPOD. I love this picture which shows a group of professional photographers at a baseball game in the 1910's. I wonder what type of film these cameras used . . . was it roll film, or did they have to load individual sheets for each photo taken? I find this to be a very exciting picture.

Domestic Update:

OK, last Sunday I described to you my new egg production improvement initiative out in Chickie Town. The initiative involved monitoring the output of each chicke, posting production charts around Chickie Town, and creating positive reinforcement by featuring a "Chickie of the Week" on the blog. The initiative was launched last Sunday at 6:00 AM. Well apparently the effort earned me a one day "Egg Embargo". Yep, while up to that day I was getting a solid 4 eggs a day, I started the program, and that day did not get a single egg. Sunday evening when it was clear to me what was going on, I went out to chickie town and rounded up the Lead Instigator, and got her and brought her into the kitchen. Mrs. PJM asked what I was doing with a chickie in the kitchen, and I told her, "Fixing Supper". Mrs. PJM kindly requested I put the chickie outside, and then she sat me down for a "talk". Mrs. PJM told me that I was putting too much pressure on the chickies, and that is why they were not laying eggs. Mrs. PJM told me that the chickies probably would appreciate their privacy when they go into the laying box, and that I should not open the top, and watch them. She further told me that walking around with my clipboard making notes on how long they were sitting there before laying an egg should stop. She went on to say that all my production posters were to be taken down. Then she said that I was to stop catching the chickies, and putting them in the laying boxes, that they would go in when they were ready. I was then told to refrain from the "lift and gently squeeze" technique of trying to get them to lay, once they were in the box. While we were there, she also mentioned that I should not walk around the house with my clipboard making notes of how many times people left lights on in a room. In fact, she asked that I turn the clipboard over to her all together.

Mrs. PJM is a City Girl, and obviously knows nothing about chickies nor modern production enhancement and management techniques. I, on the other hand grew up on a farm, and come from the corporate world, and understand the importance of modern quality and management theories. However, I have not managed to stay married to the lovely Mrs. PJM for 22 years by being stupid, so I handed over the clipboard and agreed to her new "soft" management approach to running chickie town. As soon as I took the posters down, egg production resumed, and we are now up to 6-7 eggs a day. With this, we can eat all we want, and still have a nice amount to give away to friends. It does bother me however, that I know the chickies are capable of more, and if given the opportunity to fully implement my management plan, I am confident we would be at a solid 10 eggs per day.

21 comments:

  1. If the chickies try that again, get a frozen one from the grocer and show it to them.

    You may recall the story of the foul-mouthed parrot whose owner couldn't get it to stop swearing. The parrot was put in the freezer for several minutes as punishment. Upon being released it agreed to clean up its language and asked, 'Mind telling me what that chicken did wrong?'

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  2. Mr. PJM,

    The cameras likely had roll film. If you look at the gentleman who is just to the left of centre, in today's photograph, you'll notice that he is cranking the film for the next shot.

    RATT Fan

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  3. They are using film plates. Note the pouches they are all carrying. Bigger camera, bigger pouch.

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  4. You know the old saying, "A Watched Pot Never Boils". Even a chickie needs a day off.

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  5. Hooray for Mrs. PJM! I think she has good sense.

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  6. Have you read any John Jakes novels? I recently re-read _Homeland_ and _American Dreams_, in which the main character catches the wave of the development of moving pictures.

    Mrs. PJM may be a city girl, but she is a girl, and therefore has an innate feeling for the emotional needs of the Chickies. Maybe later on, you can negotiate for limited-time use of the clipboard.

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  7. Initial results from the poll shows public opinon turning dedidedly against me in Chickie Town mangagement.

    I might have had my clipboard taken away, but I still have my spreadsheets. Oh yes, I still have my spreadsheets.
    PJM

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  8. Most of these cameramen are using a the Press Graflex camera, probably in the 5x7 inch large format film.

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  9. Nate,
    Of course, we all knew that, the real question is where did they BUY the film.
    PJM

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  10. You are to funny!
    I think that they put production at 1 egg every 30 - 36 hours per chicken.
    R

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  11. R.,
    I am aware of those production numbers, but those are without use of my modern management and production enchancement techniques.
    PJM

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  12. With regard to your egg production, you should go to the video store and pick up a movie called "Chicken Run". (Don't just 'go' there, RUN there!) It is made by the same folks from the UK that did Wallace and Gromit. It is brilliant! You'll never look at egg production in the same way again!

    Graham, St. John's, Newfoundland

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  13. Like I said, you are very humours.
    Keep up the good work.
    And go get your tractor.
    You can park it in the garage and let the Mrs. car set outside.
    R

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  14. Does Mrs. PJM's intervention explain the lack of the "chickie of the week" photo? I was so looking forward to that...

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  15. I am so looking forward to this weeks photos.
    As a photographer taking photos of others, it is great to see photos of people taking photos.
    I think Mrs PJM is in the right but will miss your contribution for great egg production. I had a great vision in my mind of you doing all the things you were doing.

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  16. When I consider the ratio of egg size to body size in your chickies, I as a woman feel a great deal of sympathy for your little feathery gals. No wonder they squawk when they lay one!

    No squeezing for gosh sake!

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  17. I know roll film was available in 1910 because I just scanned a bunch of negatives that my mother had found in my grandmothers belongings. there were some negatives of my grand mother when she was a teenager and she was born in 1888, however most of the cameras pictured here are using sheet film from what I can tell. The one does look like he is rolling the film ahead.
    Just a note about egg production, My old neighbor that has chickens has got his egg cost down to $800 each, so he says. We just bought 2 dozen grade A large for 99 cents a dozen.

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  18. My sister had an old Brownie, I know that's much later than these cameras, but to see them looking down into the camera made me think of that old Brownie. She gave it to Goodwill.

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  19. These cameras had a spring-loaded shutter. You had to wind it, then click the release.

    So he's probably winding the shutter.

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  20. Love the comments AND Mrs. PJM's well chosen words. Am laughing out loud.

    I have a neon green clipboard, PJM, you can borrow it.

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