Tuesday, February 2, 2010

White House Protest

This picture was taken in 1918. In this one the suffragettes have taken it up a notch. They are protesting at the White House, AND they have started a fire on the sidewalk. Also on the plus side, the words on the sign are higher contrast and more readable. My advise to this group is that they have too many words on the sign. They need fewer words, and something that would be easy for a mob to shout over and over.

21 comments:

  1. But, bless them, they got the job done! My Grandma, who would have been their contemporary, voted in the first election in which women could vote, and in every one thereafter as long as she lived. She instilled in me the sacred trust of being able to vote. If I ever missed going to the polls, I'm sure granny would be giving me a little nudge (or a kick in the butt!) to remind me!

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  2. Today, they would be reduced to shouting something like, "What do we want? To vote! When do we want it? Now!"

    Isn't it better when you can articulate your position clearly and fully?

    However, today they would never have gotten the banner erected, as they'd be in custody for some kind of terrorism charge for starting that fire.

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  3. It's interesting to see what was going on 92 years ago. I wonder what sort of security they had around the Casa Blanca back then? Starting a fire on the sidewalk doesn't seem to have been a big deal.

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  4. Can anyone make out what exactly the banner says? I can read it somewhat, but was hoping to know what it says in its entirety.

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  5. The WHite House grounds were very accessible until the 1940's--much like a public park. I recall seeing a photo of tourists having a picnic near the North Portico.

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  6. Click on the picture for an enlargement that is easy to read.

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  7. As someone wrote, clicking on the picture makes it very clear. The printing is flawless and so is the spelling!
    I'm wondering if the fire might be some way of staying warm..it looks like a pretty bitter day there.

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  8. That fire is blazing hard in the wind. One gust of wind in the other direction, and the banners and at least one woman would be on fire.

    Here is a picture from 2007 that's just a few yards to the right of the one from 1918. The fence and stone style are unchanged. I wonder if there's still a hint of a black mark, from that fire, on the stonework or sidewalk today.

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  9. I continue to be struck by the cleanliness of the roads and sidewalks. Considering the era and the length of time it took mail to reach Europe by ship, it's interesting to note their global outreach.

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  10. In those days their targets were the people walking by, not video cameras, so the signs were appropriate for the time.
    There was a very funny bit on "The Man Show" where they asked women to sign a petition against suffrage. Hardly anyone knew what suffrage meant and gladly signed the petition. How far we have advanced!

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  11. I suppose we have "come a long way," but I have to admit that I don't think of many of those changes have been necessarily a good thing. And I can't help but wonder if these women wouldn't agree with me, if they had the opportunity to see our society today.

    *donning my flame retardant suit*

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  12. If you read the sign, one can easily substitute the name "Obama" for "Wilson" and it would still make perfect sense today - although with a different underlying meaning.

    Too bad their little fire didn't burn the place down back them, we'd probably be better off today.

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  13. PJM:

    Ever since you put that word verification thingy on your website to stop spammers, my browser doesn't jam any more when I submit comments.

    Good for me, worse for everyone else. Now I'll never shut up.

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  14. In Wyoming, women have had the right to vote since territorial days. Wyoming also had the first woman governor, Nellie Tayloe Ross. Although the real reason women were given the right to vote has been clouded by history; one theory has been they needed their votes to even become a territory and state as X number of votes were needed and Wyoming had (and still does have) a small population. A lot of Women in Territorial Wyoming also rode astride as opposed to fashionable sidesaddle, the 'ladylike' and totally impractical method of riding.

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  15. Wow SmartGirl 1953, your comment about substituting "Obama" for "Wilson" is so correct.

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  16. Responding to Lady Kildew -- Amen Sister!

    I take my daughters with me every time I vote. And I vote in every single election from the local to the federal.

    My girls are all adopted from China, where you get one "choice" on the ballot. Here we get a real choice.

    I tell them about how my mother, their grandmother, had to live under Nazi occupation from 1939 to 1945, so there were NO elections and NO choices.

    I tell them how I am descended from one of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence and how all of them risked all for the principle of self determination.

    What we Citizens all need to do is to stop shouting at each other and start listening to each other.

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  17. Marie:

    Good for you. Yes, we get a "real" choice on the ballot; but let's face it, they're all idiots.

    And they're all looking out for their own special interests instead of the voters, no matter which party one belongs to.

    The whole thing is pathetic these days. Congress was originally supposed to be made up of ordinary working people, not lawyers who do this for a living.

    Throw them all out.

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  18. I enjoy this website and it is usually a safe haven from the right and left radicals who sometimes hijack sites for spreading their hatred of anyone opposing their point of view. I find SmartGirl's comment 'Too bad their little fire didn't burn the place down back them, we'd probably be better off today' EXTREMELY offensive. And very UNAMERICAN of her to advocate the destruction of the White House and it's inhabitants.

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  19. Shutterbug:

    I guess you don't understand hyperbole.

    Please don't take things so seriously, and I take offense at your questioning my patriotism as you know nothing about me.

    Lighten up.

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  20. SmartGirl, I do understand hyperbole - this wasn't. It was a horrible comment to wish the White House had burned down. I did not misunderstand you.

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  21. Well, I know this was a long time ago, but I have to respond to Meredith In Wyoming. I know, from personal experience, that riding sidesaddle is not at all impractical. It's very comfortable :) I've even jumped sidesaddle, and I stayed on when the horse bucked pretty bad once. I believe that the only reason you (and heaps of other people) say things like that about sidesaddles is because you know nothing about them.

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