Monday, February 15, 2010

Tent City

Good Monday morning to you all. Hope your week starts out good. We start the work week with this picture from San Francisco taken shortly after the Great Earthquake and Fire in 1906. With most of the city destroyed, tent cities sprung up. Reading the signs, you can see that these folks lost everything . . . except their sense of humor.


I am sort of surprised by the early results on the poll question. Half of you indicate that if the grocery store ran out of food, you could feed your family. I wonder if we have that many farmers as readers?



16 comments:

  1. What does the top sign say? "House of Mirth"? Perhaps a playful reference to the Edith Wharton novel?

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  2. I was a person that voted yes I could.

    I know how to hunt and fish. I have my own reloading equipment, so with the ammo I have on hand I could hunt year around for 20 years or more.
    I also have my compound bow, and have shot my fair share of deer and turkeys with it.
    I have also had gardens since I can remember, and am very good at raising produce for canning and freezing.
    R

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  3. Mirth means humor.
    I mean like they have an elevator and steam heat in a tent city.

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  4. Interesting how they are dressed. I'm impressed with the pride people used to take in their apprerance, even after a devastating earthquake. I can't even say it doesn't seem crazy, but they used to error on the civilized side I guess. Much more self respect and thus more respect for others in my opinion.

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  5. What do you mean by "if grocery stores were empty"? For a few weeks due to some disaster? Or like the wild imaginings of the people who thought Y2K was doomsday?

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  6. I assumed that the poll meant a short term shortage. I have enough stock piled to feed my small family for more than a month before we'd have to start foraging. I also have a garden, though it's really early in the year to harvest anything. Maybe I better up my storage.

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  7. Hank Jr. said it best.

    A country boy can survive.

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  8. Well said, Danny.

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  9. The people in the photo probably got "House of Mirth" from the same source as Wharton: Ecclesiastes
    "The heart of the wise is in the house of mourning; but the heart of fools is in the house of mirth."

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  10. The stores where I live practically ARE empty, due to the greed of the idiots who, every time snow is predicted, rush to the store to buy all the milk, bread, bottled water and toilet paper their giant size vehicles can hold. I mean, I've seen people with three grocery carts! Their attitude is--I'll buy up everything whether I need it or not, and anyone else is just out of luck. These people make me sick.

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  11. I can't find the poll, so I didn't answer it.

    However, if I needed to feed my family for several weeks, yes, I could. (Provided my home didn't burn down in a fire.)

    We also have seeds for veggie gardens, though the cold weather has kept us from planting yet. So I could eventually feed my family again.

    Plus I live in a forested area and know what wild plants are edible, so...

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  12. I live in an area (North Dakota) were a foot or more of snow is a ordinary event. Nobody gets excited about it amd already has a couple days supply of milk and bread on hand. (Just like any day in the Summer).
    a 20 inch snow fall with a big winds may close down the roads for a day, but that is all. The next day every thing is running as a normal day.
    R

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  13. I voted yes because as a farm family we are always prepared. We start seeds in our greenhouse in Feb. and then seedlings are put out in the fields in the spring. All produce is harvested and canned and/or frozen for winter use. My husband hunts and the farm has lots of deer and turkey so meat is not a problem (after all they eat our veggies only right we get one back in season!). We also have orchards of peaches, cherry, apples, grapes etc. As you can guess our pantry is really stocked! Only downfall is when we don't have electric we have no water. We do have have water stocked for emergency use. Also a generator as a back up helps. We just went through four days of no power, water etc. and we survived with no problems. We enjoyed playing board games and cards. Didn't even miss the internet!

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  14. Most people have enough to get by for some time with what is in the pantry, fridge & freezer. They might have to - gasp - cook from scratch or use that 3 year old can of corn, and the kids might whine, but no one would starve.
    I live in the country so have an added advantage of wild greens, my lettuce patch, lots of water storage and a big propane tank.

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  15. This looks suspiciously like that other photo from a couple weeks back. The one where people were posed in front of a log cabin, stuffed bear and elk, and badly-misspelled signs - strictly to produce gag photos.

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  16. In our current state, we could not last more than a couple weeks. However, I have the knowledge of how to grow a garden and fish, but there are no fishies where I live in the middle of the city - and if there were any, I don't think I'd be eating their polluted little bodies. Ick.

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